The Wellness Blog

Does Red Meat Cause Cancer ?

Posted by Brian Schoemehl on Sat, Nov 21, 2015 @ 04:24 PM

If you read the papers or watch the news, there is a good chance that you’ve seen tdescribe the imagehe latest nutrition report from the World Health Organization. The story has been reported worldwide by virtually every major news organization.

In case you’re not aware, the report, produced by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, implicates processed meat and red meat in colon cancer.

Here’s the gist of the press release from the IARC:

“Processed meat was classified as carcinogenic to humans … The consumption of red meat [is] probably carcinogenic to humans …”  

But don’t banish your juicy Filet Mignon just yet! The real truth of the matter is actually contained within the full report, published in The Lancet.

“Chance, bias, and confounding could not be ruled out with the same degree of confidence for the data on red meat consumption, since no clear association was seen in several of the high quality studies and residual confounding from other diet and lifestyle risk is difficult to exclude. The Working Group concluded that there is limited evidence in human beings for the carcinogenicity of the consumption of red meat”.  

In case you missed that …

There was no clear association regarding red meat consumption and cancer risk.

So, what are the real facts? Can you still enjoy your favorite Paleo meals without increasing your risk of cancer?

The Link between Eating Ice Cream… and Drowning

Did you know that decades of statistics prove that as ice cream consumption increases, so do deaths from drowning?

It’s true. There is a very clear correlation between these two statistics… but it goes without saying that ice cream does not cause people to drown.

The numbers of people eating ice cream go up sharply during the summer. As you can imagine, so too do the number of swimmers. It’s clear that correlation does not equal causation. Always keep this in mind when it comes to “scientific” reports.

In this case, the IARC considered data from over 800 different studies on cancer in humans as it relates to red and/or processed meat. Sadly, however, all of these studies were epidemiological.

These are not controlled clinical studies designed to prove causation. They are population studies, often based on questionnaires. While some population studies can provide useful information, most are unreliable.

Did You Have Fries With That?

Can you remember what you ate last Saturday? How about last year?

One reason why food questionnaires are unreliable is because they ask for historical food recall. This paves the way for poor memory and a misrepresentation of facts. There is a large difference between someone recalling that they ate a steak, when the truth was that it was a steak and fries…

… Washed down with a beer or soft drink
… Followed by a cigarette.

Another reason why these studies are unreliable is that they don’t distinguish between variables such as the source of the red meat or the preparation method. They also don't consider general diet, level of fitness (or fatness) or other carcinogens to which the subjects may be exposed.

The IARC does acknowledge this in their full report. It would be nice if the world’s media had done the same.

So now, let’s take a look at what you really need to know about red meat and cancer risk.

The 5 Unhealthy Ways to Consume Red Meat

Chargrilled Toxins
Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCAs) are formed when muscle meats; beef, pork, poultry and fish, are exposed to high temperatures such as grilling. Acrylamide is formed when plant foods rich in carbohydrates (like sugary marinades or the French fries that commonly accompany beef) are cooked at high temperatures. Research demonstrates that both of these compounds are known carcinogens. 

What Goes Into the Animal, Goes Into You
Epidemiological studies make no distinction between pasture-raised and conventionally-raised meats; main factors being their feed and the administration of hormones and antibiotics. The beef from corn-fed cows can have as much 50 times more omega-6 fatty acids than that from grass-fed cows. Too much omega-6 has been conclusively proven to promote inflammation and oxidation – two key factors that can promote cancer. What’s more, antibiotic residues from conventional meats wreak havoc on the microbiome – altering the delicate balance of microbes, including those that produce butyrate – a powerful cancer-fighting agent.

Pan-Fried Chemicals
Pots, pans, storage containers and wraps can leach harmful substances into our foods.  Non-stick pans are just one of these offenders which leach toxic substances like trifluoroacetate (TFA) and perfluorooctanic acid (PFOA) into the food you eat, as well as into the air around you. These chemicals, collectively called perflourinated compounds, are xenoestrogens (estrogen mimics) and have been linked with cancer, endocrine issues, “polymer fume fever” and other health problems in humans.

Chewing the Wrong Fats

Lipid oxidation products (LOPs) are created by the degradation of oils. This happens through heat, aging and chemicals (like hydrogenation). As these oils break down, they generate free radicals that damage DNA and have been found to increase the risk of cancer. When we heat unstable oils (like the polyunsaturated fatty acid omega-6 oils) we produce these dangerous LOP's. This could make the fat you are using to cook with carcinogenic, without regard to the meat itself.

Dietary & Lifestyle Factors

We all know that smoking is a Category 1A Carcinogen. But do you know that some contraceptives are too? Acetaldehyde, (the by-product of alcohol metabolism) and inactivity are two more key factors that increase cancer risk. And how about being overweight or obese?  According to the National Cancer Institute, obesity is overtaking tobacco as the leading preventable cause of cancer.  It goes without saying that these kind of variables cannot be ruled out as potential causes of cancer in “population” studies.

Cancer Prevention through Ancestral Wisdom

  1. Choose Healthy Sources: When choosing meats, choose grass-fed and pasture-raised to achieve a healthy fat balance and avoid exposure to antibiotic residues, pesticides and hormones that can encourage cancer.
  2. Nourishing Preparation: If you're going to cook at higher temperatures, be sure to choose stable fats like tallow, lard, coconut oil or grass fed butter. Better still, focus your cooking around stewing, boiling, poaching and slow cooking when it comes to meats. Cook with non-toxic cookware like ceramic, enamel or cast iron to reduce toxic chemicals leaching into your food. And use natural herbs and spices to bring out the flavor and nutritional value of the meal.
  3. Don’t Forget Your Veggies: Enjoy a colorful, varied diet with lots of fresh organic produce (free from hormone-mimicking pesticides). Also be sure to include microbe-loving lacto-fermented vegetables such as like sauerkraut or kimchi.
  4. Live a Balanced Lifestyle: Maintain a smoke free, active lifestyle and a healthy weight. If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation and opt for organic red wine which is high in antioxidants, including the powerful cancer-fighter resveratrol.
  5. Reduce Toxins: Take into consideration all of the “inputs” that make their way into your body via your stomach, lungs and skin. Breathe fresh air, consider an indoor HEPA filter to reduce your exposure to indoor pollution, and choose household and personal care products made without harmful ingredients.
  6. Get Sunshine: Vitamin D is one of the most powerful cancer-fighting nutrients known. In fact, a study presented at the 53rd Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) found that 75% of cancer patients had low vitamin D levels , and those with the lowest vitamin D levels were associated with more advanced cancers.  

Prevent (and fight) cancer with a healthy, active lifestyle and the diet that models our ancestors including an abundance of organic veggies and low-glycemic fruits, lacto-fermented foods, stable, traditional fats and meats from animals raised on pasture that are prepared safely. In addition, don’t smoke, achieve (or maintain) a healthy weight, optimize your vitamin D levels and avoid chemicals in household and personal care products to reduce your risk of cancer.

ED NOTE

Love bread, but not the blood-sugar spiking carbs and grains? Check out Kelley’s newest book, Better Breads, including more than two dozen low-carb, grain-free, prebiotic-rich Paleo breads, biscuits, pancakes, muffins and more! Click here to learn more about Better Breads

REFERENCES
(1)  International Agency for Research on Cancer. Media Press Release #240.

(2)  Bouvard, V. Loomis, D. Guyton, K. et al. Carcinogenicity of consumption of red and processed meat. The Lancet Oncology. Published online Oct 26, 2015. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1470-2045(15)00444-1

(3)  Muscat JE, Wynder EL. The consumption of well-done meat and the risk of colorectal cancer. American Journal of Public Health 1994; 84(5):856-858.

(4)  Friedman M, Levin CE.Review of methods for the reduction of dietary content and toxicity of acrylamide.J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 13;56(15):6113-40. Epub 2008 Jul 
15.

(5)  Wikipedia. List of IARC Group 1 carcinogens

(6)  Cancer Research UK. Physical Activity Facts And Evidence.

(7)  National Cancer Institute. Obesity and Cancer Risk.

(8)  Vitamin D deficiency common in cancer patients. American Society for Radiation Oncology. Oct. 3 2011

Bonefeld-Jorgensen, Manhai Long, E. Bossi, R. et al. Perfluorinated compounds are related to breast cancer risk in greenlandic inuit: A case control study. Environmental Health 2011, 10:88. doi:10.1186/1476-069X-10-88.

Zoe Harcombe. Diet, obesity, nutrition and big business: So much, so wrong. World Health Organisation, meat & cancer. 

Blouin JM1, Penot G, Collinet M, Nacfer M, Forest C, Laurent-Puig P, Coumoul X, Barouki R, Benelli C, Bortoli S.Butyrate elicits a metabolic switch in human colon cancer cells by targeting the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.Int J Cancer. 2011 Jun 1;128(11):2591-601. doi: 10.1002/ijc.25599. Epub 2010 Oct 8.

Gonçalves P1, Araújo JR, Pinho MJ, Martel F.In vitro studies on the inhibition of colon cancer by butyrate and polyphenolic compounds. Nutr Cancer. 2011;63(2):282-94. doi: 10.1080/01635581.2011.523166.

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Paleo, Heart Health, Good Fats, Weight Loss, US Wellness Meats

Are "Aliens" Making You Hungry?

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Oct 09, 2015 @ 04:09 PM
Have you ever felt strong emotional cravings for certain foods? And have you ever experienced these cravings… even when you knew that your body had enough to eat.

It’s well known that emotions and stress can play a role in food cravings. And of course, your hormones also send signals to your brain that boost hunger and cravings.

But what if there was something else that could cause these feelings? In fact, what if some of the cravings you experience did not even originate in your own brain… but instead, you were acting on impulses from another entity?

This might sound like the beginning of a science fiction story. In this case, however, the truth might be stranger than fiction.

You’ve probably heard the word, microbiome. This is the ecosystem of microbes that reside primarily in your gut. We already know that this swirling mass of bacteria play a role in your immune system. They help digest your food and even provide vitamins and nutrients your body needs.

But this is not merely a passive population of hitchhikers, happy to eat whatever you decide to feed them. In fact, a growing number of researchers believe that the bacteria in your gut can promote feelings of hunger. What’s more, they can actually influence your dietary choices so that you favor the foods THEY thrive on (or those that suppress their competitors).

And that’s not necessarily a good thing…

“Bacteria within the gut are manipulative,” says Dr. Carlo Maley, one of the authors of a study published in the journal BioEssays. “There is a diversity of interests represented in the microbiome. Some are aligned with our own dietary goals. Others are not.”

 

What Does Your Bacteria Want From You?

Estimates are that the average person has between 15,000 and 30,000 different species of bacteria, fungi and other microbes in their gut. Each of these species has a preference for specific food sources that allow them to feed and reproduce.

Some species of gut bacteria thrive on the fiber found in vegetables. Some are specialists that digest and prefer seaweed (these have been isolated from humans in Japan). Others thrive on cellulose (these have been found in African children raised on sorghum).

Researchers have even identified certain populations of bacteria that are common to those who have a “strong desire” for chocolate... while those who are indifferent to chocolate have a very different bacterial mix.

And then there are those species that thrive on sugar, grains and the basic ingredients of the standard processed diet…

According to author and genetic epidemiology professor, Tim Spector, the microbes living inside you, “have their own evolutionary drive to maintain their ecological niche. They will do anything to ensure their survival. This includes sending signals to the host human that they want more of the same junk food that they thrive on.”

Yes, it’s true…

To ensure their own dominance and survival the bugs in your gut will insist that you consume whatever they say, even when it’s not in the best interests of your health.

And scientists are just beginning to understand how this works…

 

Willpower Is No Match For Bio-Power

It’s proven that the brain can use signaling molecules to influence gut bacteria. But the lines of communication go both ways.

Not only do these bacteria recognize the hormones and neurotransmitters your body uses. They can even synthesize these chemical signals to control your behavior!

A recent study, published in the journal BioEssays highlights the ways these “alien” hitchhikers can potentially control your brain.

The authors believe your gut bacteria may be able to change the expression of your taste receptors, making certain foods taste better.

They can release hunger-inducing hormones and peptides.

They are able to stimulate the vagus nerve directly (this is the connection between 100 million nerve cells in the digestive tract and the base of the brain).

They can even manipulate your feelings by producing compounds that are converted into dopamine and serotonin – thus taking control of your body’s basic “feel good” reward system!

These “aliens” want you to feed them and they will stop at nothing until you do.

 

But you CAN outsmart them and get the control back.

You are not powerless when it comes to creating a good relationship with the “aliens” that reside in your gut. The key is to do things that cause the thousands of species of good bugs to proliferate, so that they can “outcompete” and overcome the species of bad bugs.

The good news is that researchers have measured positive changes in the microbiome within just 24 hours of positive dietary changes. These are simple changes that you can make outside the lab.

Again, from the study in BioEssays:

“Because microbiota are easily manipulatable by prebiotics, probiotics, antibiotics, fecal transplants, and dietary changes, altering our microbiota offers a tractable approach to otherwise intractable problems of obesity and unhealthy eating.”


How Can You Cultivate a Healthy Inner Ecosystem?


As I’ve noted in previous essays, here are the six easy steps to a balanced microbiome and a better relationship with food:

1.    Re-populate the good bacteria:  Populate your healthy gut bacteria with good probiotic food sources including lacto-fermented vegetables (like sauerkraut and kimchi), kefir, kombucha and other foods preserved using traditional methods. Probiotic supplements are also useful in changing gut populations.

2.    Maintain daily with natural probiotic foods: Our ancestors obtained a lot of their probiotic bacteria from the soil. These bacteria, called soil based organisms (SBOs), support digestive balance. Consume fresh, organic veggies raised in healthy soil, and don’t wash them too ‘clean’.

3.    Feed the good bacteria and starve the bad: Many vegetables contain powerful prebiotic fiber that feeds our good bacteria. Onions, jicama, garlic and leeks are great choices. Reduce and eliminate sugar along with processed grains. These feed the growth of hostile microorganisms.

4.    Don’t kill them with pesticides and antibiotics: Choose organic, pesticide-free foods to avoid destroying the good bacteria you are working so hard to nourish. Source grass-fed meats, organic pastured poultry, organ meats and wild caught fish, which are free of antibiotics. Avoid antibiotics and use only when necessary.

5.    Minimize modern products: To maintain the integrity of the gut, minimize or eliminate the use of antibacterial products. Consume only filtered or spring water, which doesn’t contain chlorine, perchlorate and fluoride. And remove gut-damaging processed foods such as those containing aspartame, sucralose and preservatives. These have been shown to destroy gut bacteria.

6.    Stress Less: Our ancestors experienced periods of stress followed by periods of rest. By adopting a similar lifestyle we can influence our microbiota in positive ways.  In the words of the popular book “don’t sweat the small stuff”.

 

Are You Growing Sugar-Craving or Vegetable-Loving Bugs?


Our microbiome starts growing the day we are born; the type of birth we had and the health of our mother begins the process. Our environment influences these bugs as we journey through life. Modern processed diets and toxic lifestyles influence the growth of the bad bugs, while ancestral diets support the good guys.

It's like a garden; plant it well, remove the weeds and don’t kill the flowers. Your current food preferences provide feedback about what type of garden was planted and how it was maintained.

By choosing to eat and live the way our ancestors did, we can improve the balance of our microbiome and our relationship with food.

ED NOTE
Love bread, but not the gut-harming carbs and grains? Check out Kelley’s newest book, Better Breads, including more than two dozen low-carb, grain-free, prebiotic-rich Paleo breads, biscuits, pancakes, muffins and more! Click here to learn more about Better Breads

REFERENCES
1.    Alcock, J. Maley, C., Aktipis, A. Is eating behavior manipulated by the gastrointestinal microbiota? Evolutionary pressures and potential mechanisms. BioEssays, August, 2014. DOI: 10.1002/bies.201400071
2.    Norris, V, Molina, F, Gewirtz, AT. Hypothesis: Bacteria Control Host Appetites. J Bacteriol. 2013 Feb; 195(3): 411–416.
3.    Wallis, C. “How Gut Bacteria Help Make Us Fat and Thin.” Scientific American. June 1, 2014.
4.    Beck, J. “Your Gut Bacteria Want You to Eat a Cupcake.” The Atlantic. August 9, 2014.

Topics: Misc Info, Weight Loss

Do You Need a Sugar Detox? (4 Easy Ways to Tell!)

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Wed, Aug 27, 2014 @ 05:16 PM

By: Kelley Herring, Healing GourmetSugar

  • Do you ever find yourself needing something sweet as a “pick me up” during the day?
  • Do you experience deep cravings for foods like chocolate or ice cream… or have trouble stopping once you start eating sweets?
  • Do you have difficulty saying “no” to dessert or candy when it’s offered at work or social gatherings?
  • If so, you’re not alone. In fact, most people find that they have a love-hate relationship with sweets. And the reason might surprise you.

Sugar: The Taste of Sweet Survival

We have a primal urge to eat sugar. In fact, humans are evolutionarily hard-wired to crave sweets.

You see, when the food supply was very unpredictable – and caloric energy was difficult to come by – calories were an evolutionary advantage. Sweetness represented energy, and energy meant survival.

Of course, in the days of our ancestors, sweet foods were uncommon, available only at certain times of the year or they took a lot of effort to obtain (picture yourself climbing a tree or cliff face to gain access to a bees nest). There was also competition for sweet foods from animals and others in your tribe.

But all of that has changed. Where sweets were once scarce and difficult to obtain, today they are cheap and ubiquitous.

While the landscape of our food supply has changed, the hard-wired survival instinct to consume sugar has not.

Sugar Addiction & Deafening Leptin's Message

The result? A vicious cycle of sugar addiction.

Some people say that eating sweets is like “opening Pandora’s box”. Once they have that brownie, cookie or any form of sweet treat – it’s difficult to stop.

But it’s not just about a lack of willpower. Your hormones are also to blame.

After eating a sugar-sweetened treat, blood sugar levels rise. The hormone insulin (often called the fat-storing hormone) is called upon to mobilize sugar from the blood. As blood sugar levels fall, signals are sent to the brain that available energy is dwindling. Hunger ensues.

And what do you reach for? That cookie… or brownie… or sweet treat – the very food that put you in the hormonal hunger cycle in the first place.

But there’s more to the equation than just blood sugar and insulin.  Eating sugar actually deafens the message sent to your brain that you’re full. And it does this by causing leptin resistance.

Leptin (also known as the satiety hormone) is an important regulator of hunger. It monitors the amount of energy we consume and provides feedback to our brain. When leptin works properly, our eating is in control. But as we become resistant its signals, this important biofeedback mechanism is compromised.

The result is not just that we become hungry again faster after eating a sweet treat – it’s also that we tend to eat more on the rebound because we’re not satisfied.

Of course, the most visible result of sugar addiction is weight gain. But a high sugar diet is also closely correlated with every chronic disease.    

Chronic Disease & A High Sugar Diet

In addition to promoting systemic inflammation and speeding up the aging process, a high sugar diet is associated with heart disease, declining brain health, cancer and more.

And while I could fill a book with the studies that establish this correlation, I’d like to share two recent ones that I think are particularly meaningful:

•    Sugar and Declining Brain Health: In a recent study published in the journal Neurology, researchers found a direct relationship between brain shrinkage and blood sugar. They also found a direct relationship between memory loss and elevated blood sugar. What’s more, it wasn’t just “diabetic” levels of blood sugar that caused these effects – even relatively moderate elevations caused harm to the brain and memory.

•    Sugar and Heart Disease: The Journal of the American Medical Association published a report this month entitled Added Sugar Intake and Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality among US Adults. Researchers evaluated how added sugars in the diet related to the risk of death from a cardiovascular event. The study showed a direct correlation between the amount of added sugar in the diet and the risk for death from a cardiovascular event. What’s more, when the researchers compared people whose added dietary sugars accounted for less than 10% of their total calories to those whose added sugar exceeded 25% of daily calories, those consuming the most added sugar had a 300% higher risk of death from a cardiovascular event!

How To Do A Sugar Detox

Detoxing from sugar and adopting a long-term, low-sugar lifestyle isn’t just important to improve body your body composition: it’s absolutely essential to prevent chronic disease.
Doing a sugar detox is especially important:

•    If you ever feel controlled by cravings for sweets and carbs – or you just can’t say no
•    If you become irritable or have mood swings based on blood sugar
•    If you feel you need sweets or carbs for a boost of energy during the day
•    If you just can’t stop once you start eating sweets

Did you answer “yes” to any of these questions? If so, your health would greatly benefit from a firm commitment to completely QUIT sugar for at least three to four weeks.

When I say sugar, of course I mean processed foods containing sugar like candy and soda. But I’m also talking about natural forms of sugar – honey and maple syrup – as well as starches that are rapidly converted into sugar.

And while many “sugar detox” programs still allow some level of carbohydrate and even fruit as part of their detox program, this strategy typically isn’t sufficient to fully elicit the important metabolic and hormonal changes that can help you break your sugar addiction including:

•    Resetting your metabolism from a “sugar burner” to a “fat burner”
•    Eliminating wild fluctuations in mood and energy levels
•    Resetting appetite and reducing leptin resistance
•    Resetting your taste buds so you no longer require sweet foods to feel satisfied

In fact, most people find they achieve the biggest benefit and quickest results by focusing their consumption solely on grass-fed meats, pastured poultry and eggs, wild fish, bone broth and stock, healthy fats (lard, tallow, grass-fed butter, duck fat, coconut oil) and non-starchy vegetables.

Here’s what your sample sugar detox daily menu might look like:

Breakfast: Pastured eggs with grass-fed butter or coconut oil, pastured pork sausage and avocado

Lunch: Atlantic mackerel or wild salmon burger or grass-fed beef burger, mixed green salad with olive oil and vinegar

Dinner: Duck breasts, leafy greens and bell peppers sautéed in duck fat with garlic

Snacks: Bone marrow, bone broth, olives, Brazil nuts

(Please Note:  My sample menu is a very low carb/potentially ketogenic menu that may not be appropriate for everyone.)

I want to hear from you! Have you done a sugar detox? If so, what were your results… what did you experience… and what foods did you enjoy during that time?

______________________________________________________________________________

Ed. Note: Kelley Herring is author of more than a dozen books on nutrition and natural healing. She is also the co-founder of Wellness Bakeries, which has just released their newest product - Better Bread - a 100% Paleo bread mix you can whip up in 5 minutes flat.

______________________________________________________________________________
REFERENCES
1.    Lucia Kerti MA, A. Veronica Witte PhD, Angela Winkler MA, Ulrike Grittner PhD, Dan Rujescu MD, Agnes Flöel MD. Higher glucose levels associated with lower memory and reduced hippocampal microstructure. Journal of Neurology. November 12, 2013
2.    Quanhe Yang, PhD; Zefeng Zhang, MD, PhD; Edward W. Gregg, PhD; W. Dana Flanders, MD, ScD; Robert Merritt, MA; Frank B. Hu, MD, PhD. Added Sugar Intake and Cardiovascular Diseases Mortality Among US Adults. JAMA Internal Medicine. February 3, 2014  
3.    Banks WA1, Coon AB, Robinson SM, e al. Triglycerides induce leptin resistance at the blood-brain barrier. Diabetes. 2004 May;53(5):1253-60.

Topics: Paleo, Weight Loss

Is He Joking?

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Thu, Jul 17, 2014 @ 11:16 AM

By: Dr. Al Sears, MDSupplements

It’s hard to believe in 2014. But it’s still going on.

Every so often I’ll read or hear a doctor or professional organization say there’s no evidence that a vitamin supplement does anything for anybody.

Eliseo Guallar and his colleagues at The American College of Physicians wrote an entire paper entitled, “Enough is enough: Stop wasting money on vitamin and mineral supplements.”(1)

And this kind of thing keeps getting repeated.

Just listen to Dr. Benjamin Caballero, director of the Center for Human Nutrition at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health: “The evidence for supplementing with any vitamin … is just not there.”(2)

Or Jaakko Mursu, Ph.D. and colleagues on the Iowa Women’s Health Study: “Based on existing evidence, we see little justification for the general and widespread use of dietary supplements.”(3)

And Steven Nissen, chairman of cardiology at the Cleveland Clinic: “The concept of multivitamins was sold to Americans by an eager nutraceutical industry to generate profits. There was never any scientific data supporting their usage.”(4)

Chart
But the evidence that we do need to supplement our nutrient-poor diet continues to mount, until we could fill entire libraries with the evidence. So people see and hear this stuff and they become confused.

They come to me from all over the world as if there’s this great controversy about whether they should take a supplement or not.

I want to tell you what I always tell them. In my mind, there is no controversy. It is virtually impossible to get optimal nutrients for optimum health and aging from our diet.

And you’ll really be chronically deficient if you follow the RDI guidelines. Those were only designed to prevent illness, not to get you to your best health. If you follow them, you’ll be deprived.

What’s more, as the chart shows, most people don’t even get the RDI for nutrients… So people are not even meeting what would keep them nutritionally deprived even if they met the guidelines!

Even young people, who have a higher metabolism and can eat more food than the average 50 or 70-year-old, with all the extra food they eat, only 1% of them are getting the nutrients they need.(5)

Part of the reason is that our produce doesn’t have enough minerals. They’re grown on mineral and nutrient-depleted soils. Many of them have been genetically altered to grow faster which lessens their nutrients…

For every generation for the past century the nutrient content has gone down. And it’s going down faster in this century with the speed at which crops are being modified.

Did you know you would have to eat 26 of today’s apples to equal just one apple from 1914?(6)

Even the U.S. Department of Agriculture admits that vitamin and mineral levels have fallen by as much as 81 percent over the last 30 years.(7)

So it’s a brave new world. I’m not saying I have every solution to every nutritional problem, but I can tell you there is a problem there. And you need to be informed by someone so you can do something about it. Doctors burying their heads in the sand and saying there is no evidence of a problem is ignorance.

So what to do? It’s simple: Give your body back what you’ve been deprived of so you can get your nutrients, minerals and antioxidants for healthy aging and optimal health. Here’s how:

1) Increase your mineral intake. Magnesium, selenium, and the other essential minerals are mostly missing from the Western diet. Take chromium for example. Our food animals don’t eat their native diet of chromium-rich grass anymore, and there’s less chromium in produce.

It’s a crisis because chromium is a co-factor for insulin. Insulin uses chromium to transport sugar out of your blood and into your cells where it’s burned as energy. Without chromium, it leads to weight gain and diabetes. Even mild insulin dysfunction will make you have low energy levels, produce more fat, make you crave sweet foods, and gain pounds.(8)

But chromium can reverse this. One study took commercial pigs and fed them chromium and measured significant fat reduction. They changed nothing else about the pigs … all they did was give them chromium and they got lean.(9) They had an increase in muscle, as well.

An Austrian study gave one group of people a calorie-restricted diet and another group chromium for 26 weeks. The people in the chromium group lost just as much weight as the people eating almost nothing. The people taking chromium had increased lean muscle mass.(10)

You can get lots of chromium from grass-fed beef, ripe organic tomatoes and a source that may surprise you: red wine. Grilled steak, tomatoes and a glass of wine sounds like a tasty summer meal to me.

But you’ll still have to supplement. Because you need 400 mcg a day for optimal health, and even that delicious meal will only give you around 50 mcg.

2) Power and protect with CoQ10. Another supplement I recommend is one that I don’t know how you could get enough of without going through a lot of trouble, unless you take a supplement.

You’d have to hunt wild animals and eat their internal organs fresh … but I wouldn’t even recommend that today. Yet that’s where CoQ10 concentrates. You need it because it powers every single cell in your body. It’s so important that revealing how CoQ10 works won Peter Mitchell the Nobel Prize in 1978.

The best source of CoQ10 is the closest thing you’re going to get to a wild animal – grass-fed meat. I was lucky to grow up eating grass-fed beef, and I still do today. Grass-fed beef contains more CoQ10 than any other meat on the planet.

You can take a CoQ10 supplement, but many of the powder and tablet forms are worthless. They won’t get absorbed into your cells.

That’s why I recommend the ubiquinol form of CoQ10. It’s already in the form your body uses. Take 50 mg of ubiquinol each day (to increase its effectiveness, combine CoQ10 with PQQ).

What I do is take a good multivitamin, multi-mineral, and a multi-antioxidant. I figure I’m getting a lot of the bases covered to get me back to optimal nutrient status. In fact we’ve gone to great length to formulate our own supplements according to what I believe is deficient in our environment.

To Your Health,
Al Sears, MD

______________________________________________________________________________

Sources:

1. Guallar E, Stranges S, Mulrow C, Appel L, Miller E. “Enough is enough: Stop wasting money on vitamin and mineral supplements.” Ann Intern Med. 2013;159(12):850-1.
2. Caballero B. “Should healthy people take a multivitamin?’ Clev Clin J Med. 2010;77(10):656-7.
3. Mursu J, Robien K, Harnack L, Park K, Jacobs D, “Dietary Supplements and Mortality Rate in Older Women.” Arch Intern Med. 2011;171(18):1625-1633.
4. Klein E, et. al. “Vitamin E and the risk of prostate cancer: the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT).” JAMA. 2011;306(14):1549-56.
5. Shay C, et. al. “Status of Cardiovascular Health in US Adolescents: Prevalence Estimates From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) 2005–2010.” Circulation. 2013; 127: 1369-1376.
6. Lindlahr, 1914: USDA 1963 and 1997
7. “Vegetables without Vitamins,” Life Extension Magazine March 2001
8. Tsai, Chung-Jyi, Leitzmann, Michael F., Willett, Walter C., et al, “Macronutrients and Insulin Resistance in Cholesterol Gallstone Disease,” Am. J. of Gastroenterology, 2008;103:2932-2939
9. Lindemann, M. D., Wood, C. M., Harper, A. F., et al, “Dietary chromium picolinate additions improve gain: feed and carcass characteristics in growing-finishing pigs,” J. Anim. Sci. 1995; 73:457-465
10. Bahadori, B., Wallner, S., Schneider, H., et al, “Effect of chromium yeast and chromium picolinate…” Acta. Med. Austriaca 1997; 24(5):185-7

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Good Fats, Weight Loss

Summer Secret to Fat Loss

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Thu, Jun 19, 2014 @ 04:09 PM

By: Dr. Al Sears, MDSummer

Here’s something to remember as we get into summer with Independence Day, picnics, ice cream and other summer indulgences. This is a very important tip for losing weight, but few people seem to know about it.

You can cut calories and still gain weight. You can work out until you pass out and still have that spare tire belly.

The truth is: we don’t get fat because we eat too much. And it’s not because we are lazy...

Staying slim boils down to this: Hormones make you fat.

But today I’m going to show you how to deal with fat and hormones using a few tricks on eating to lose weight.  There are also some powerful nutritional supplements to balance hormones and help with fat loss.  I use these natural health products at my Wellness Center in South Florida, which helps control hormonal fat storage.

Case in point: the hormone insulin is your number one fat builder.  It tells your body to pack on the pounds.

You produce a storm of insulin when you eat foods high on the Glycemic Index. As a general rule of thumb, carbs are the foods highest on the GI.

It surprises my patients when I tell them what the highest GI food is that my wellness clinic has ever tested.

Care to guess?

It’s corn bread - a traditional favorite among Americans. Every time you take a bite of corn bread, insulin pours into your blood and tells your body to store the calories as fat.

High blood sugar levels require insulin to process it. Eventually, your body gets tired and stops responding, which is called insulin resistance.

Blood sugar that your body cannot (or will not) process gets stored as fat. This is why foods with excess carbohydrates cause weight gain.

I take this a step further with my patients. The idea is to eat foods that do not spike your blood sugar and to also let your blood sugar come back down after eating. You don’t want your insulin to stay elevated for too long.

This means eating foods with a low Glycemic Load (GL).

The GL is simply a number you get when you multiply a food’s Glycemic Index (GI) rating by the total amount of carbohydrate in each serving you eat.

That makes it much more practical for everyday life because the GL identifies how fattening a food is. It’s a fresh way to look at everyday foods. Some GL ratings may surprise you – especially foods like watermelon...high GI, but low GL.

I consider foods with a Glycemic Load under 10 the best choice. They are a green light. Foods that fall between 10 and 20 on the GL scale are more like a yellow light (not bad, but proceed with caution).

Foods above 20 are a red light. They will not only make you gain weight but will also prevent you from dropping weight. Foods above 20 should be eaten sparingly. Replacing these foods with protein is a better alternative. Protein has a GL of zero. For my complete Glycemic Load Chart, click here.

1) Banaba leaf tea is something they traditionally brew in Bali to help regulate blood sugar naturally.

Medical scientists believe that the banaba leaf’s beneficial effects on blood sugar are due to its high concentration of corosolic acid. It mimics insulin by moving sugar out of the bloodstream and into your cells.

Numerous scientific studies have proven the banaba leaf’s effectiveness. It lowers blood sugar with no side effects.(1) 50 mg of banaba leaf extract with 1-2 percent corosolic acid will help control your blood sugar.

2) L-carnitine can significantly improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

The body is not able to make enough L-Carnitine on its own from simply eating meat. Therefore, I recommend using one gram per day of a L-Carnitine supplement in a liquid form. A liquid is more absorbable than a L-Carnitine powder or capsule. Whichever source of L-Carnitine you select; be sure the supplement uses naturally occurring l-carnitine.

3) Chromium is another important mineral to help control insulin sensivity.

Without enough chromium in the body, insulin just doesn’t work properly.

Chromium is in many foods including brewer’s yeast, meats, potato skins, cheeses, molasses, and fresh fruits and vegetables.

Despite the wide availability of chromium from food sources, research shows that 90% of American adults have a chromium-deficient diet.

But you can’t take just any form of chromium as a supplement. Some types of chromium may actually do more harm than good and research shows that it needs to include niacin to be effective.

Look for chromium polynicotinate or niacin-bound chromium, which are both safe and effective as a dietary supplement. Take 400 mcg a day.

Learn more about ways to lose weight and control blood sugar naturally by subscribing to my free newsletter “Doctor’s House Call” or by ordering a copy of my book, High Speed Fat Loss in 7 Easy Steps.

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References:

1. Ikeda, Y. “The clinical study on water extract of leaves of Langerstroemia Specious L. for mild cases of diabetes mellitus,” 1998 (unpublished)

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Paleo, Weight Loss

Reset Your Hunger Hormone to Shed Fat Easily

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Thu, Apr 24, 2014 @ 10:49 AM

By: Dr. Al Sears, MDWaist

Have you ever shivered on a cold day? Do you ever feel a little light-headed when you stand up too fast? I’m sure you’ve broken a sweat while doing your PACE exercises, right?

What you’re feeling is your body trying to return itself to “normal.” In medicine we call that homeostasis. Your body is reacting to its environment and trying to get back within its natural chemical, hormonal and temperature ranges.

Hunger is a good example. When your energy levels are low, normally your hunger hormones (like leptin and insulin) signal your body to eat. When you’ve eaten enough, your hormones should tell you that you’ve had enough.

So eating enough should blunt your appetite. Your body should go back to a balanced state, and have homeostasis.

That also means that if you gain weight, homeostasis should send a signal to eat less, use more energy, and bring you back to “normal.”

But there’s a problem … in the real world, it doesn’t work that way.

We do eat too much. We have obesity.

You can get fat.

Shouldn’t this be impossible? How can every other system in your body be regulated by homeostasis except your weight?

The answer is in the food we eat.

The food choices you’re presented with as “healthy” are processed sugars and starches, and hormone- and pesticide-laden meats and dangerous preservatives. These foods lack the basic nutrition your body needs.

When you eat these foods, homeostasis tells your body it hasn’t gotten any nutrition, and to eat more. So you eat more of these processed carb-heavy foods that spike your blood sugar. This triggers the hormone insulin to bring your blood sugar down. But when insulin drops your blood sugar too low, you crave even more carbs.

This vicious cycle eventually leads to weight gain that overcomes nature, and homeostasis.

This is “hormonal hunger” and it’s what the modern world has done to you. The processed foods, grains and starches that you’ve been sold over the last 50 years have changed your body so that it overrides homeostasis and keeps on eating.

The good news is, you can reverse the effects of years of conventional food and nutrition. You can return your body, and your hormones, to a “normal” state and never have to worry about getting fat if you follow these simple steps:

Eat quality calories. Conventional doctors will tell you the key to fat loss is cutting back on calories. But it’s not about the quantity of calories. It’s all about the quality of calories. Eat meals based on protein … as many different kinds of protein as you can get. Because protein signals your body to stop eating. Getting enough protein tells your body that times are good, and flips your metabolic switch from “store fat” to “burn fat.” Then your body will use the calories as essential fuel to function at its best.

Eat the right fats.  Don’t cut back on fat, either … Instead, eat the right fats like omega-3s. Your body uses them to absorb vitamins and nutrients.

Practice short-duration, high-intensity, progressively challenging workouts.  Exercise is one of the best ways to shed fat and reset your hormones.(1) But the key to lasting fat loss is to teach your body to burn fat after you exercise – not while you exercise. My PACE program helps your body reset your hormone signals so you can burn off fat.

Take a multivitamin. Unless you’re the rare exception, you’re probably not getting the nutrition you need from food. Choose a brand you trust, with natural forms of the nutrients, so you can actually absorb them and they’re available for your body to use.

Eat low-glycemic-index foods.  High-glycemic-index foods, which are usually the processed ones, are loaded with sugars, starches and grains and cause hormonal hunger. But low-glycemic-index foods – foods that don’t raise your blood sugar – that are also the most nutrient-dense curb your appetite and you’ll shed fat in no time. These include seeds, nuts, wild-caught salmon, grass-fed beef, free-range poultry, eggs, berries and fruits, and vegetables.

Avoid high-fructose corn syrup.  It’s been found to cause hormonal hunger.(2) One more reason to stay away from processed foods or anything packed in a box, can or plastic container (even if it’s labeled organic).

Don’t skip meals.  It’ll only put your body in starvation mode and make you binge on carbs that mess with your blood sugar and hunger hormones. Eat three balanced meals a day, especially breakfast, and snack on those nutrient-dense foods in between.

To Your Good Health,

Al Sears, MD

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Editors Note:  Dr. Al Sears, M.D. is a board-certified clinical nutrition specialist. His practice, Dr. Sears' Health & Wellness Center in Royal Palm Beach, Fla., specializes in alternative medicine. He is the author of seven books in the fields of alternative medicine, anti-aging, and nutritional supplementation, including The Doctor's Heart Cure. To get his free special report on the proven anti-aging strategies for building a vibrant, disease-free life, go here now. You'll learn how to stop Father Time without giving up the foods you love.
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References:

1. Reseland, Janne E. “Effect of long-term changes in diet and exercise on plasma leptin concentrations,”American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 2001;73(2): 240-245
2. Shapiro, A., Mu, W., Roncal, C., et al, “Fructose-induced leptin resistance exacerbates weight gain in response to subsequent high-fat feeding,” Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol. 2008; 295 (5)

Topics: Weight Loss, Exercise

Going Gluten Free… the Right Way

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Dec 06, 2013 @ 10:26 AM

By: Kelley Herring, Healing GourmetGlutenFree

According to the market research firm, NPD Group, about one third of Americans – or more than 100 million people – are actively seeking gluten-free foods. They also estimate that the gluten-free market will climb to $6.6 billion annually by 2017.

For those who have been diagnosed with celiac disease or a gluten intolerance, this dietary change is a necessity. But many more people are choosing to shun gluten as a personal choice.

Most people who have given up gluten believe that doing so can improve their health and help reduce the risk of chronic disease.

But could giving up something as common and widely consumed as grain – one of the “four food groups” and the very foundation of the food pyramid – actually increase longevity, reduce the risk of disease and promote a healthy, lean body composition?

According to a growing pile of research, the answer to that question is a resounding YES!

Should You Go “Against the Grain”?

Not long ago, the notion that gluten-containing foods could have negative effects on healthy individuals (without celiac disease) was something that mainstream medicine flatly denied.

Gluten free was called “a fad” and those who made this choice were often met with strong resistance by friends, family, food establishments, and of course, the medical profession.  

But the evidence continues to mount against gluten.…

In fact, a report in the New England Journal of Medicine linked gluten to 55 conditions, including fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, osteoporosis, anemia, rheumatoid arthritis, depression, and even cancer.

Proponents of the Paleo diet have long believed that grains – including gluten-containing grains such as wheat, barley and rye – don’t belong in our diets. The reason is simple and logical: Our genetics haven’t changed much since the days of our Paleolithic ancestors, and these Neolithic foods have negative consequences on our genes, and in turn, on our long-term health.

But there’s something more to consider. The grains that were enjoyed by our more recent ancestors – such as those from Europe and early America a hundred years ago – were altogether different than those we consume today. Those heritage grain varieties still contained gluten. But they contained far less than the modern, hybridized strains of today.

In fact, with the help of modern agriculture, food manufacturers now cultivate grains that contain up to 40 times more gluten than the varieties that were grown just thirty years ago!

And what’s more, our consumption of these “super-gluten” grains has dramatically increased.

Estimates show we’re eating 25 percent more gluten than we did in 1970. We consume triple the amount of vital gluten (a wheat-derived food additive) that we did just a decade ago.

In short, we’ve super-sized our consumption of super-gluten!

Many prevention-minded doctors are speaking out about the effects of this toxic food. David Perlmutter, MD, author of Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth About Wheat, Carbs and Sugar – Your Brain’s Silent Killers – believes that as much as 40 percent of the population cannot tolerate gluten.

William Davis, MD, preventive cardiologist and author of Wheat Belly, describes how this “unhealthy grain” causes systemic inflammation and blood sugar surges. Over time, this can lead to cardiac risk factors, central obesity (dangerous belly fat) and even liver disease.

As the media outlets release this important information with increasing frequency and fervor, sales of gluten-free foods have skyrocketed.

But there’s something important about “going gluten free” that you should know…

Gluten Free: From The Frying Pan… Into the Fire

Most commercially prepared gluten-free foods are not any better than their “super-gluten” counterparts.

Most of these foods are still highly refined. They contain chemicals and preservatives. And they are usually rich in carbohydrates and sugars – the very same components that promote inflammation and blood sugar surges in gluten-containing foods.

Simply being gluten-free doesn’t make it a healthy choice. You should avoid gluten-free packaged foods that contain high-glycemic, inflammatory and artificial ingredients including:

•    Rice flour
•    Potato flour/starch
•    Soy flour/protein
•    Sugar
•    Artificial sweeteners

You should also know that while certain “flours” are considered Paleo-friendly – such as tapioca flour and arrowroot powder– they are still high in carbohydrates and should be consumed in moderation.

For a long life and a lean body, base your diet around the high-protein, low-sugar, grain-free Paleo foods we were designed to enjoy – grass-fed meats, pastured eggs, wild fish, and organic veggies, with nuts, fruits and dairy in moderation.

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ED NOTE: Kelley Herring is the creator of a best-selling low-glycemic, gluten-free and Paleo baking program, Guilt-Free Desserts. She is also the co-founder of Wellness Bakeries, which has just released their newest product – Better Bread – a 100% Paleo bread mix you can whip up in 5 minutes flat.
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REFERENCES
1.    Boyle, Matthew, Gluten Takes a Beating From Fad Dieters and Grain Giants, Bloomberg.com, November, 2013
2.    David, William, MD. Wheat: The Unhealthy Whole Grain. Book Excerpt: Wheat Belly. Life Extension Magazine October 2011.
3.    Perlmutter, David, MD. Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth About Wheat, Carbs and Sugar – Your Brain’s Silent Killers. Little Brown 2013.
4.    Klöting N, Fasshauer M, Dietrich A, et al. Insulin sensitive obesity. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Jun 22
5.    Deprés J, Lemieux I, Bergeron J, et al. Abdominal obesity and the metabolic syndrome: contributions to global cardiometabolic risk. Arterioscl Thromb Vasc Biol. 2008;28:1039–49.
6.    Bengmark S. Advanced glycation and lipoxidation end products—amplifiers of inflammation: The role of food. J Parent Enter Nutr. 2007 Sept-Oct;31(5):430–40.
7.    Uribarri J, Cai W, Peppa M, et al. Circulating glycotoxins and dietary advanced glycation endproducts: Two links to inf lammatory response, oxidative stress, and aging. J Gerontol. 2007 Apr;62A:427–33.

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Paleo, Heart Health, Weight Loss

Holiday Fat-Fighting Secret

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Dec 06, 2013 @ 10:24 AM

By: Dr. Al Sears, MDWine

Here’s something to remember before the holiday “eating season” begins. This is very important, but nobody seems to know it…

You can cut calories and still gain weight. You can work out until you pass out and still have that spare tire.

The truth is, we don’t get fat because we eat too much. And it’s not because we’re lazy.

Staying slim boils down to this: Hormones make you fat.

But today I’m going to show you how to beat them with a few eating tricks, and some powerful nutrients I use at my Wellness Center to help control hormonal fat storage.

Case in point: the hormone insulin is your number one fat builder. It tells your body to pack on the pounds.

You produce a storm of insulin when you eat foods that are high on the Glycemic Index. As a general rule of thumb, carbs are the foods highest on the GI.

It surprises my patients when I tell them what the highest GI food is that the clinic has ever tested.

Care to guess?

It’s corn bread, a holiday favorite. Every time you take a bite of corn bread, insulin pours into your blood. And it tells your body to store the calories as fat.

All that blood sugar means you have to produce insulin to process it. Eventually, your body gets tired and stops responding, which is called insulin resistance.

Blood sugar that your body can’t or won’t process gets stored as fat. So it’s foods with excess carbohydrates that can make you fat.

I take this a step further with my patients. The idea is to eat foods that don’t spike your blood sugar, and to also let your blood sugar come back down after eating. You don’t want your insulin to stay elevated for too long.

This means eating foods with a low Glycemic Load (GL).

The GL is simply a number you get when you multiply a food’s Glycemic Index (GI) rating by the total amount of carbohydrate in each serving you eat.

That makes it much more practical for your everyday life because the GL tells you how fattening a food is. It’s a fresh way to look at everyday foods. Some GL ratings may surprise you – especially foods like watermelon … high GI, but low GL.

I consider foods with a Glycemic Load under 10 as good choices. They are a green light. Foods that fall between 10 and 20 on the GL scale are more like a yellow light: not bad, but proceed with caution.

Foods above 20 are a red light. They will not only make you gain weight but keep you from dropping weight, just like Howard Stern is experiencing. Eat those foods sparingly and try to eat protein instead. Protein has a GL of zero. For my complete Glycemic Load chart, click here.

There are also a few nutrients that can help you improve your body’s use of insulin and make you more sensitive to it so it works better:

1) Banaba leaf tea is something they traditionally brew in Bali to help regulate blood sugar.

Medical scientists believe that banaba leaf’s beneficial effects on blood sugar are due to its high concentration of corosolic acid. It mimics insulin by moving sugar out of your bloodstream and into your cells.

And numerous scientific studies have proven banaba leaf’s effectiveness. It lowers blood sugar and there are no side effects.1 50 mg of banaba leaf extract with 1-2 percent corosolic acid will help you control your blood sugar.

2) L-carnitine can improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

The problem is your body can’t make enough l-carnitine on its own from eating meat. So I recommend supplementing with a gram a day in the liquid form. It’s more absorbable compared to the powders and capsules. Make sure you choose a supplement that uses naturally occurring l-carnitine.

3) Chromium is another important mineral to help control and rebuild your sensitivity to insulin.

Without enough chromium in your body, insulin just doesn’t work properly.

Chromium is in many foods including brewer’s yeast, meats, potato skins, cheeses, molasses, and fresh fruits and vegetables.

Despite the wide availability of chromium from food sources, research shows that 90 percent of American adults have a chromium-deficient diet.

But you can’t take just any chromium as a supplement. Some types may actually do more harm than good. And research shows that it needs niacin to be effective.

Look for chromium polynicotinate, or niacin-bound chromium, which is safe and effective as a dietary supplement. Take 400 mcg a day.

______________________________________________________________________________

Editors Note:  Dr. Al Sears, M.D. is a board-certified clinical nutrition specialist. His practice, Dr. Sears' Health & Wellness Center in Royal Palm Beach, Fla., specializes in alternative medicine. He is the author of seven books in the fields of alternative medicine, anti-aging, and nutritional supplementation, including The Doctor's Heart Cure. To get his free special report on the proven anti-aging strategies for building a vibrant, disease-free life, go here now. You'll learn how to stop Father Time without giving up the foods you love.

______________________________________________________________________________

References:

1. Ikeda, Y. “The clinical study on water extract of leaves of Langerstroemia Specious L. for mild cases of diabetes mellitus,” 1998 (unpublished)

Topics: Weight Loss

Eat Huge Holiday Meals Without Accumulating Body Fat!

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Nov 22, 2013 @ 01:08 PM

By: Scott Mendelson, Infinity FitnessThanksgiving

Scott,

One of your clients told me he has had great success with your cheat meal strategies to prevent body fat accumulation.  I am going to eat “Big Time” on Thanksgiving Day and that is not negotiable, however I am willing to exercise more on Thanksgiving Day so I can get away with more eating!  What can I do to prevent this big day of eating from increasing my belly fat?  
Art  

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Art,

Yes, Dr. Serrano and I have developed several proven strategies for preventing body fat accumulation during big holiday meals.  These large meals can actually be beneficial for boosting metabolism and fat burning hormones when executed correctly.  Many women in particular, chronically eat too little and as a result metabolism becomes very sluggish.  Working with clients over the years I have found that including a large meal weekly or every other week very important for fat burning.

Get the Proven Cheat Meal Body Fat Accumulation Prevention Strategies in the blog post!

Strip Load Training Fires up Metabolism

Your success will all start with firing up the metabolism and fat burning hormones with an intense weight training session 1-2 hours before the large meal.  The strip load training routine below is a metabolic game changer and creates the ideal metabolic environment for a large meal to follow.  Strip load training uses a strategic drop in load to allow for more high quality repetitions than normal workouts.  The conditions created allow the muscle bellies to open up and take in more nutrients from your big meal instead of spilling over into your fat cells! In some cases for advanced clients we may choose to weight train twice in one day with customized programming.

Avoid an In-law Clash!

Yes, a higher activity level on days when you plan to eat big makes perfect sense and hey, a trip to the gym can minimize conflicts with the visiting in laws!  Find tasks to do around the house to keep you on the move and out of the kitchen.

Eat Organic!

Organic protein choices have fewer fat storage properties even when consumed in large quantities vs. commercially raised animals.  Dietary fats within organic and grass fed animals are free of fat storage hormones such as estrogen, which are typically given to commercially raised animals to increase their body weight for higher auction prices.  So get an organic turkey or other wild bird to be featured on Thanksgiving.

Control Appetite with the Great Tasting Appetizers

Before the big sit-down meal use great appetizers that will help to control appetite.  Instead of crackers and bread rolls, use higher fiber vegetables with organic cheeses and dips.  Vegetable intake will help to fill you up more quickly and digest big meals properly.  Also consider organic beef snack sticks and other protein-based snacks as appetizers- they are always a big hit!

Keep the Desserts Under Control

Hey - it is Thanksgiving, there is no problem with having a piece of pumpkin pie, but be practical!  Overeating desserts will get you into trouble quickly.  So limit dessert to one or two choices so you do not set yourself up for a belly ache!  Fruit makes for a great dessert choice as it is very filling due to the dietary fiber content

Get Rid of the Bad Food Choice Leftovers

It is important to get back to optimal nutrition habits the day following Thanksgiving or any holiday for that matter.  Get the high sugar desserts and other high carbohydrate leftovers out of the house!  If they are not there, you will not eat them!  Otherwise, you can find yourself eating poorly for an entire week or more and before you know it Christmas arrives with another week of bad food choices.  As a result, a couple weeks of poor food choices will pack on body fat quickly!  

Strip Load Training

  Exercise Sets Reps Tempo Rest
A1 45-Deg Incline Press 3 5-6 3-2-1-0 20
A2 45-Deg Incline Semi-Neutral Grip Press 3 7-8 3-2-1-0 75
B1 Neutral Grip Pull Up/Pull Down 3 5-6 3-1-1-2 20
B2 Chin Up/Chin Grip Pull Down 3 7-8 3-1-1-2 75
C1 Chest Supported OH Row 2-3 5-6 3-1-1-2 20
C2 Chest Supported UH Row 2-3 7-8 3-1-1-2 75
D1 Prone DB Front Raises 2 8-10 3-1-1-2 20
C2 30-Deg Incline Rotation Fly 2 8-10 3-2-1-2 45


See exercise video clips here

Complete two warm up sets of each exercise before performing the work sets to ensure you have identified the proper challenging load while practicing proper execution.

Following the 5-6 reps of exercise A1- reduce the load 15-20% and immediately (within 20 seconds ideally) perform exercise A2, rest 75 seconds and repeat the A series a total of three times before moving on to the B Series.  Emphasize proper exercise form, tempos and sticking to the short rest periods to earn the greatest fat burning impact from your training session.

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Email Scott@infinityfitness.com for free copies of the Fat Cell Cleansing Special Report, the Kiss Rapid Fat Loss Nutrition Male and Female plans, Success Calendar and the 21 Rapid Fat Loss Nutrition Tips.  Email Scott@infinityfitness.com to discuss your barriers to success and get a personal response right away!

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Infinity Fitness INC provides training, fitness, and nutritional information for educational purposes. It is important that you consult with a health professional to ensure that your dietary and health needs are met. It is necessary for you to carefully monitor your progress and to make changes to your nutritional and fitness program to enjoy success. Infinity Fitness does not employ dieticians or health professionals and assumes no responsibility or liability for your personal health and condition. For more information regarding our Limited Warranty for products and services, please see our disclaimer at InfinityFitness.com.  Copyright © Infinity Fitness INC All Rights Reserved 2013

This document is provided by Infinity Fitness INC for general guidance only, and does not constitute the provision of health or fitness advice.  The information is provided “as is”  with no assurance or guarantee of completeness, accuracy, or timeliness of the information, and without warranty of any kind, express or implied, including but not limited to warranties of performance, merchantability, and fitness for a particular purpose.  


Topics: Weight Loss, Exercise

Whose Liver Are You Calling Fat?

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Thu, Oct 10, 2013 @ 01:17 PM

By: Dr. Al Sears, MDFat

Did you know that fat is the biggest threat to your liver? As you age, your liver collects more fat, and it’s worse if you have increased body fat.

This puts you at a high risk for liver damage and can even promote liver cancer.

This is one of the worst consequences of age and having extra body fat, and is one of those areas where having extra fat makes you age faster.

The good news is if you have an older liver that is fatty, or if you just have a lot of body fat, there are things you can do about it. I’ll give you my three steps to drop fat safely and protect your liver at the same time.

Why is this important to you?

Because your liver gives you the energy you need to get through the day, and detoxifies your body. Plus it turns nutrients into their usable forms. This helps your body act more youthful and keeps the needle in your energy tank on “full.”

Fat is even more important than the effects of alcohol. Studies show alcohol contributes to only 6% of damage to the liver. But being a bit overweight contributes to 52% of liver disease.(1) And if you’re obese, you’re 400% more likely to develop liver damage than a normal-weight individual.

That doesn’t mean you can drink whatever you want… Surprisingly, normal-weight people who didn’t drink at all had just as much risk of liver disease as normal-weight individuals who drank a couple of glasses of wine with their supper.

So unless you drink to extremes, it really comes down to how much fat your liver accumulates.

If you need more proof of the dangers to your liver from being overweight, take a look at this new study. Researchers discovered that obesity causes mice to get liver cancer. Obesity turns on a cancer-promoting protein, and turns off enzymes that usually protect your liver.(2)

However, simply dropping a lot of pounds quickly can hurt your liver. Cutting calories and starving yourself can dehydrate your liver. And instead of losing body fat, dieting may cause you to lose mass in your vital organs and not body fat.

Here are my three recommendations for safely dropping the pounds and protecting and helping your liver so you can cleanse your body and have plenty of energy:

Step 1) Burn the Fat You Can’t See: We know from past studies that with short-duration pulses of exertion you can burn 9 times more fat than with long endurance exercise for every calorie burned.(3)

This is essential for your liver because the kind of fat that accumulates there is called visceral fat. It wraps around organs like your heart, liver, and kidneys and is far more dangerous to your health than subcutaneous fat, which lies right beneath your skin. Visceral fat is a storehouse for toxins that pump directly into your body.

But although you can’t see it, you can get rid of it. In a new study, researchers looked at how exercise affects visceral fat. They looked at a group of 44 obese girls and put them in three groups. One group did aerobic exercise, one did resistance training and one did nothing.

After a few weeks, the people who did aerobic exercise had lost a significant amount of visceral fat compared with the other groups.4 And they weren’t even doing short bursts of exertion, like I recommend. Imagine how much more fat they would have lost if they had been!

To take it a step further, what I discovered in my practice is that you can increase the fat loss by focusing on progressivity in your exertion. You don’t have to start with a high intensity workout right off the bat. The idea is to work out for shorter periods, and then incrementally increase the challenge to your body.

Your body will burn the visceral fat off your organs and keep burning off body fat long after your workouts. To try this for yourself, take a look at my PACE Express program.

Step 2) Measure fat loss the right way: How do you know when you’re losing fat in a healthy way? Easy. Simply keep track of your body composition. You’re looking for lots of lean muscle and a high ratio of that muscle to body fat.

There are scales you can buy that calculate your body fat for you. There are also hand-held devices that are reliable. You can find these on the Internet or you can get a set of the calipers I use at my clinic right here. They come with simple instructions. For men, the average is between 15-17 percent body fat. For women, the average is between 18-22 percent.

Another even easier way is to grab your skin between your finger and thumb just to the side of your navel and measure the thickness of the skin fold. It should measure less than 1 inch in both men and women. Even these rough approximations of your body fat are more useful than the archaic and misleading tables invented by insurance companies.

Step 3) Detoxify your liver a couple of times a year: Here’s a list of liver-detoxifying herbs I use in my practice that work well:

  • Milk Thistle – This is the plant Silybum marianum and it’s my first choice. I have been able to document its capacity to heal damaged livers by measuring serum liver enzymes. I recommend 200 mg in capsule form twice a day. Look for dried extract with a minimum of 80% silymarin, the active ingredient for liver cleansing.
  • Alfalfa – This herb cleanses the blood and liver. It can also lower cholesterol. It’s a good source of protein, vitamins A, D, E, B-6, and K, calcium, magnesium, chlorophyll, phosphorus, iron, potassium, trace minerals, and several digestive enzymes.
  • Dandelion – This root stimulates bile production and acts as a diuretic for excess water produced by a diseased liver. Asian and Western physicians alike use dandelion to treat hepatitis, jaundice, swelling of the liver, and deficient bile secretion.

Try mixing your own blend of these herbs. You can also look for a pre-mixed blend with as many of these ingredients as you can find on the label.


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Resources:

1. Zoler M. “Obesity is the Cause of Most U.S. Liver Damage: Risk of Disease Fourfold Higher in Obese.” Family Practice News. July 1, 2004.
2. Gruber S, Straub B, et. al. “Obesity Promotes Liver Carcinogenesis via Mcl-1 Stabilization Independent of IL-6Rα Signaling.” Cell Rep. 2013. pii: S2211-1247(13)00385-9.
3. Tremblay A, Simoneau JA, Bouchard C. Impact of exercise intensity on body fatness and skeletal muscle metabolism. Metabolism. 1994;43(7): 814-818.
4. Lee S, et. al. “Aerobic exercise but not resistance exercise reduces intrahepatic lipid content and visceral fat and improves insulin sensitivity in obese adolescent girls.” Am J Physiol Endocr Metab. 2013. Epub ahead of print.

Topics: Heart Health, Weight Loss