The Wellness Blog

Duck Legs with Apples

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Wed, Nov 20, 2013 @ 12:26 PM

The French have many recipes for different duck parts, especially the breasts and the legs. Duck legs have a deep flavor, and can be very tender. This recipe uses traditional French ingredients and techniques to pair duck legs with apples. Apples are often used in cooking duck, all over Europe. Crisping the skin in duck fat lends great flavor, while the stewed apples go perfectly with the tender meat.

1 USW duck leg highServes 2.

INGREDIENTS

1 package U.S. Wellness Meats duck legs

2 tablespoons U.S. Wellness Meats duck fat

1 teaspoon coarse unrefined sea salt, crushed

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground organic black pepper

1/2 teaspoon organic granulated garlic powder

2 large organic apples, cored and cut into one-inch chunks, with the skin

3 cloves organic garlic, coarsely chopped

1 small organic onion, sliced

1/2 cup white wine, (an inexpensive Spanish sherry is ideal)

DIRECTIONS

  1. Sprinkle all sides of the duck legs with the salt, pepper, and garlic powder.
  2. Heat the duck fat over medium heat in a ten-inch heavy-bottomed frying pan, until the fat is hot and bubbly. Carefully place the duck legs, skin side down, in the fat. Cook over medium heat for 5 minutes.
  3. Turn the duck legs over, and cook over medium heat for 5 more minutes. This should give you some very crisp skin.
  4. Pour most of the duck fat from the pan into a bowl, leaving about a tablespoon. Add the apples, garlic, and onions to the pan, and cook for 1 minute, stirring.
  5. Place the duck legs back into the pan, skin side up, nestling them among the apples and onions. Reduce the heat to low. Add the wine. Bring the mixture to a simmer, cover, and cook for about 30 minutes, or until the duck legs are easily pierced with a fork.

describe the imageStanley Fishman is a cookbook author and blogger who is an expert on cooking grassfed meat. Stanley uses traditional flavor combinations and cooking methods to make the cooking of grassfed meat easy, delicious, and tender. Stanley has written two cookbooks that make it easy to cook grassfed meat —Tender Grassfed Meat: Traditional Ways to Cook Healthy Meat and Tender Grassfed Barbecue: Traditional, Primal and Paleo. Stanley blogs about real food and the cooking of grassfed meat at his blog Tendergrassfedmeat.com.

Topics: Recipes, Product Information, Misc Info

Portuguese Tenderloin

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Tue, Oct 29, 2013 @ 12:46 PM

Tenderloin is one of the most expensive and valued cuts of beef. It is easy to cook, but also easy to ruin, so using a good technique is important.

I have a secret about tenderloin that I will admit for the first time. Despite its great reputation, I used to dislike it. Then I discovered grassfed beef. I was delighted to discover that grassfed tenderloin had a nice, beefy flavor, and a great, tender texture. But it is important that grassfed tenderloin come from cattle that have grazed on rich grass, and been properly aged.

Tenderloin is one of the most classic cuts of steak in Europe. It seems that almost every nation has its own special way of making this very special meat. France alone may have close to a hundred versions, or more. Yet my favorite way of making tenderloin comes from Portugal, a nation small in size and population, but whose cuisine is huge in flavor and creativity. My version is very easy. The marinade ingredients really bring out the wonderful beefy flavor. This recipe has been designed for the best source of grassfed tenderloin I know, U.S. Wellness Meats. They sell great tenderloin steaks in two sizes, six-ounce, and nine-ounce. Either size is perfect for this recipe.

3792 filet mignon

Serves 2.

INGREDIENTS

2 (6 ounce) grassfed tenderloin filet mignon steaks, or 2 (9 ounce) tenderloin filet mignon steaks

For the Marinade

2 cloves organic garlic, finely chopped

1 teaspoon organic parsley leaves, finely chopped

1 bay leaf, crumbled

3 tablespoons unfiltered organic extra virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon white wine, preferably from Spain or Portugal. I use an inexpensive Spanish sherry.

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground organic black pepper

For the Cooking

2 tablespoons pastured butter

1/2 teaspoon coarse unrefined sea salt, crushed

DIRECTIONS

  1. The night before you plan to make the steaks, make the marinade by combining all ingredients and mixing well. Place the steaks in a glass bowl, then cover all surfaces of the meat with the marinade. Cover, and let sit at room temperature for an hour, then refrigerate overnight.
  2. Remove the bowl from the refrigerator about an hour before you plan to cook the steaks, so they can warm to room temperature.
  3. Heat the butter over medium heat in a small heavy frying pan, until the butter is hot and bubbly. Remove the meat from the marinade, and sprinkle with the salt just before you put it in the pan.
  4. Cook for 3 minutes on each side if you are using the 6-ounce steak, or 4 minutes on each side if you are using the 9-ounce steak. This timing should give you a wonderful medium rare steak.
  5. You can cook the meat longer if you like, but this steak is traditionally cooked to medium rare, or rare. Cooking it too long adversely effects taste, texture, and tenderness.
describe the imageStanley Fishman is a cookbook author and blogger who is an expert on cooking grassfed meat. Stanley uses traditional flavor combinations and cooking methods to make the cooking of grassfed meat easy, delicious, and tender. Stanley has written two cookbooks that make it easy to cook grassfed meat —Tender Grassfed Meat: Traditional Ways to Cook Healthy Meat and Tender Grassfed Barbecue: Traditional, Primal and Paleo. Stanley blogs about real food and the cooking of grassfed meat at his blog Tendergrassfedmeat.com.

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Recipes, Misc Info

Soothing Duck Broth

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Mon, Sep 16, 2013 @ 10:56 AM

When people hear the words "Duck Soup," they often think of a movie made by the Marx brothers.

But duck soup actually has an important role in the cooking traditions of many countries. Duck is quite beefy in flavor, and makes a very robust and refreshing broth. Several cultures traditionally used duck soup to treat lung problems, and to help an invalid recover their strength.

In Chinese medicine, duck meat and duck soup are often used to treat asthma, coughs, lung problems, and other illnesses. And a properly made duck broth is so tasty and renewing. I find it energizing.

The best parts of the duck for making soup are the wings and gizzards, as they create a very gelatinous broth, which sooths the stomach. U.S. Wellness Meats now sells high quality natural duck wings and duck gizzards, which are perfect for making duck broth.

This soup uses a traditional Chinese flavor combination to flavor the broth. The use of unrefined sea salt adds nourishing minerals to the broth. It is delicious as well as nourishing.

8 USW Broth max

Makes approximately 8 quarts.

INGREDIENTS

2 packages U.S. Wellness Meats duck wings

1 package U.S. Wellness Meats duck gizzards

3 organic green onions, cut into two-inch pieces

3 organic garlic cloves, halved

3 slices organic fresh ginger, each slice being about the size of a quarter (25-cent coin)

2 tablespoons coarse unrefined sea salt

Plenty of filtered water

DIRECTIONS

  1. Place all ingredients in a large stainless steel stockpot. Add enough filtered water to cover the duck pieces by about four inches. Heat the pot over high heat until the broth reaches a boil, then reduce the heat so the broth simmers slowly rather than boils. This may take awhile, due to the large volume of ingredients and liquid.
  2. When the water is close to boiling, remove the scum that rises to the top with a slotted spoon. This can also take awhile, but is necessary.
  3. Once the broth has reached a simmer, cover and simmer gently for 12 hours or longer. It will be ready after 12 hours.
  4. Using a ladle, strain into jars, and cover. When the bottles have cooled down, refrigerate. The fat will rise to the top and will solidify in the refrigerator. This fat cap will help preserve the broth. The fat should be removed before serving, and can be used for many cooking purposes. The broth should be brought to a quick boil when reheated, then allowed to cool to the desired degree of hotness.
describe the imageStanley Fishman is a cookbook author and blogger who is an expert on cooking grassfed meat. Stanley uses traditional flavor combinations and cooking methods to make the cooking of grassfed meat easy, delicious, and tender. Stanley has written two cookbooks that make it easy to cook grassfed meat —Tender Grassfed Meat: Traditional Ways to Cook Healthy Meat and Tender Grassfed Barbecue: Traditional, Primal and Paleo. Stanley blogs about real food and the cooking of grassfed meat at his blog Tendergrassfedmeat.com.

Topics: Recipes, Free-Range Poultry, Misc Info

Rib Steak with French Flavors

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Aug 16, 2013 @ 11:33 AM

A bone in rib steak is one of the favorite French steak cuts. This steak, cut from the prime rib area, has great flavor and tenderness. The bone is left in for flavor. There are many ways to cook this wonderful cut of meat. This recipe uses another French tradition—using duck fat to flavor and cook beef. Using different types of fat to flavor meat is traditional in many cultures. This may seem unusual to you, but the results are absolutely delicious. Duck fat has a flavor that intensifies the beefy taste of grassfed meat. US Wellness meats sell both bone in rib steaks and duck fat. The olive oil really carries the flavor of the duck fat into the meat. I might add that duck fat is absolutely great when used to roast vegetables, whether they be sweet potatoes, potatoes, onions, pepper, eggplant, squash—almost any vegetable that can be roasted.

This steak is very easy, and very delicious.

2 US Wellness French Rib Steak

Serves 2 to 4.

INGREDIENTS

2 bone in U.S. Wellness French Ribeye steaks

2 tablespoons unfiltered extra virgin olive oil

2 tablespoons duck fat

1/2 teaspoon dried organic thyme

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground organic black pepper

1 additional tablespoon duck fat, for frying

DIRECTIONS

  1. At least 1 hour before you plan to cook the steaks, take them out of the refrigerator so they can reach room temperature. Place the steaks in a glass bowl and coat all sides with the olive oil, then 2 tablespoons of the duck fat. The duck fat may solidify or stay in solid form as you coat the meat with it. This is okay. Sprinkle the thyme and black pepper over the steaks.
  2. Let the steaks rest in the bowl, covered, at room temperature for 1 hour.
  3. Heat the remaining tablespoon of duck fat over medium heat in a heavy frying pan. Cast iron is ideal, but stainless steel also works well. When the fat is hot and bubbly, carefully place the steaks in the pan.
  4. Cook for 4 to 7 minutes on each side over medium heat, depending on how you like your steaks. 4 minutes a side will give you a rare steak, 5 minutes a side will give you a medium rare steak, and longer will give you a steak that is pink to well done. Traditionally, this kind of steak was cooked very rare.
describe the imageStanley Fishman is a cookbook author and blogger who is an expert on cooking grassfed meat. Stanley uses traditional flavor combinations and cooking methods to make the cooking of grassfed meat easy, delicious, and tender. Stanley has written two cookbooks that make it easy to cook grassfed meat —Tender Grassfed Meat: Traditional Ways to Cook Healthy Meat and Tender Grassfed Barbecue: Traditional, Primal and Paleo. Stanley blogs about real food and the cooking of grassfed meat at his blog Tendergrassfedmeat.com.

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Recipes, Product Information

Hamburger with Kebab Flavors

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Wed, Jul 24, 2013 @ 10:42 AM

When most people think of kebabs, they think chunks of meat on a metal rod, with chunks of vegetables. Yet some of the most popular and traditional kebabs are made from ground meat, and molded into a long thin shape on metal rods.

Since I never have been successful at getting kebabs of any sort to rest properly on a rod, I decided to try some of the same flavorings in a hamburger.

It is important to the success of this recipe that the parsley and the onion be chopped by hand. It only takes a few seconds with a good cleaver or chopping knife. You could use a food processor or blender, but the flavor will not be the same.

This recipe calls for egg yolks, not egg whites. Yes, this recipe actually uses the yolks and discards the whites. The yolks do a great job of holding the various ingredients together, while adding taste and nutrition.

1 Kebab Burger23

Serves four.

INGREDIENTS

1 pound grassfed ground beef

1/4 cup organic parsley, very finely chopped

1/4 cup organic onion, very finely chopped

1 tablespoon unfiltered organic extra virgin olive oil

2 organic egg yolks, preferably from pastured chickens

1/2 teaspoon natural sea salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground organic black pepper

2 tablespoons butter, for the pan frying

DIRECTIONS

  1. Place all the ingredients in a large glass bowl, and mix together. It is best to mix the ingredients just enough so they are evenly distributed. Form the mixture into four hamburger patties, roughly one inch thick.
  2. Heat the butter in a heavy frying pan over medium heat. When the butter is hot and bubbly, add the burgers and cook for five minutes over medium heat.
  3. Turn the burgers over and cook for another five minutes over medium heat.

describe the imageStanley Fishman is a cookbook author and blogger who is an expert on cooking grassfed meat. Stanley uses traditional flavor combinations and cooking methods to make the cooking of grassfed meat easy, delicious, and tender. Stanley has written two cookbooks that make it easy to cook grassfed meat —Tender Grassfed Meat: Traditional Ways to Cook Healthy Meat and Tender Grassfed Barbecue: Traditional, Primal and Paleo. Stanley blogs about real food and the cooking of grassfed meat at his blog Tendergrassfedmeat.com.

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Recipes, Misc Info

Polish Bison Pot Roast with Mushrooms

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Wed, May 22, 2013 @ 09:52 AM

Few people think of Poland when they think of bison, yet Poland has its own wild bison. They live in one of the oldest forests in Europe, which had been left pretty much untouched. They are very similar to the much more famous bison of the United States. Bison were at one time considered a food for royalty and the nobles, and were hunted as a highly desired prestige food.

While the nobles would eat the choicest cuts, sometimes the peasants would get hold of the less prestigious cuts, like the chuck, and they developed some interesting recipes. This recipe was inspired by reading an old story where a pot roast of wild bison, "fragrant with mushrooms and cream," was served and found absolutely delicious. It also revived and energized the tired travelers.

Wild mushrooms were (and are) a favorite food in Poland, and they can give great flavor. If you can find Polish borowicki mushrooms, the flavor will be the most authentic, but porcini mushrooms will work fine, as they are closely related.

I have added onions (sure to be present in almost any Polish pot roast), and a few traditional Polish spices. The bison comes out very tender, and the flavor is different yet delicious.

3 USW Bison Polish Mushroom

Serves 4.

INGREDIENTS

1 U.S. Wellness Meats bison chuck roast

1/2 ounce dried wild mushrooms, either porcini or Polish borowicki

1 cup filtered water

4 tablespoons pastured butter

1 large organic onion, sliced

1 cup fresh crimini mushrooms, (or other fresh mushrooms), sliced

1/2 cup organic full-fat cream

1/2 teaspoon organic granulated garlic powder

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground organic black pepper

DIRECTIONS

  1. At least 2 hours before you plan to cook the bison, remove it from the refrigerator so it can come to room temperature. Place the dried mushrooms in a small bowl, heat the filtered water to boiling, and pour over the dried mushrooms.  Let the mushrooms soak in the hot water for 2 hours.
  2. Heat 2 tablespoons of butter over medium heat in a heavy bottomed pan until the butter is hot and bubbly. Brown the roast in the butter over medium heat until golden brown, about 5 minutes on each side. Remove the meat to a plate.
  3. Drain and dry the soaked mushrooms, and reserve the soaking liquid. Add 2 more tablespoons of butter to the pan over medium heat. When the butter is hot and bubbly, add the onions, fresh mushrooms, and the soaked dried mushrooms to the pan. Cook over medium heat, stirring often, for about 5 minutes, which should give the mushrooms a nice golden brown color.
  4. Preheat the oven to 250 degrees. Add the meat to a casserole large enough to hold it, and cover the meat with the onion-mushroom mixture, making sure that some of the mixture is at the sides of the meat. Strain the soaking liquid into a bowl (straining gets rid of any soil that might have clung to the dried mushrooms). Add one half cup of the strained soaking liquid to the casserole. Add the cream, and the garlic powder, and pepper. Stir well. Cover, and cook at 250 degrees for 3 hours, or until a fork goes easily into the meat. Serve and enjoy the wonderful flavors.

describe the imageStanley Fishman is a cookbook author and blogger who is an expert on cooking grassfed meat. Stanley uses traditional flavor combinations and cooking methods to make the cooking of grassfed meat easy, delicious, and tender. Stanley has written two cookbooks that make it easy to cook grassfed meat —Tender Grassfed Meat: Traditional Ways to Cook Healthy Meat and Tender Grassfed Barbecue: Traditional, Primal and Paleo. Stanley blogs about real food and the cooking of grassfed meat at his blog Tendergrassfedmeat.com.

Topics: Recipes

Roast Lamb Loin with English Herbs

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Wed, May 08, 2013 @ 11:41 AM

Lamb loin is one of the most delicious and treasured cuts of lamb. Cooked to medium rare, or to a pink color, it can be so tender and absolutely delicious. Yet many people think they do not like lamb.

If you want great lamb, it is important that the meat come from a breed used for eating, rather than wool. Sheep with wool often have a very strong and gamy flavor to their meat.

The lamb should be grassfed, as lamb tastes very much like what the animal was fed.

The roast must also be cut properly, with the natural bone and fat.

The rack of lamb split loin roast sold by U.S. Wellness Meats fits all these requirements perfectly. It comes from Katahdin sheep, a meat breed which is not used for wool. It is grassfed only.

And it is cut perfectly for roasting. The meat is in one piece, surrounded by the natural bone and a thin layer of the natural fat. Unlike supermarket lamb loins, the bones are not cut through. While cutting through the bones makes it easy to cut the meat into chops after roasting, it results in the loss of natural juices and flavor The uncut bones provide incredible flavor and juiciness to the meat, which is flavored by the bones and the fat. This also makes the meat more tender. The bones and fat are the two best spices you could have for this meat. The bones also make a perfect roasting rack.

In this recipe, I have added some English herbs that enhance the already wonderful flavor. There was a famous song that contained the words "Parsley, Sage, Rosemary, and Thyme..." Few people realize that these herbs form a traditional English flavor combination, one that is fantastic with lamb.

Rackoflamb0734

Serves 2 to 4.

INGREDIENTS

1 U.S. Wellness Meats rack of lamb split loin roast

1 teaspoon organic fresh parsley, finely chopped

1 teaspoon organic fresh sage leaves, finely chopped

1 teaspoon organic fresh rosemary leaves, finely chopped

1 teaspoon organic fresh thyme leaves, finely chopped

1 teaspoon coarse unrefined sea salt, crushed

2 tablespoons U.S. Wellness Meats extra virgin olive oil, early or mid-season

DIRECTIONS

  1. About an hour before you plan to cook the roast, combine all the other ingredients in a small bowl and mix well. Place the roast on a plate, and rub the mixture all over the meat, fat, and bones. Let rest at room temperature for about an hour.
  2. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  3. Place the lamb bone side down in small roasting pan. Place the pan in the oven, and roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until done to your taste. 25 minutes should give you a medium rare roast. Using a sharp, sturdy knife, cut between the meat and the bones, which will give you a cylinder of delicious boneless meat. Cut the meat into serving pieces. Enjoy the wonderful flavor!

describe the imageStanley Fishman is a cookbook author and blogger who is an expert on cooking grassfed meat. Stanley uses traditional flavor combinations and cooking methods to make the cooking of grassfed meat easy, delicious, and tender. Stanley has written two cookbooks that make it easy to cook grassfed meat —Tender Grassfed Meat: Traditional Ways to Cook Healthy Meat and Tender Grassfed Barbecue: Traditional, Primal and Paleo. Stanley blogs about real food and the cooking of grassfed meat at his blog Tendergrassfedmeat.com.

Topics: Recipes, Grass-fed Lamb

US Wellness Lamb

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Wed, Apr 24, 2013 @ 09:35 AM

We get a lot of questions about our lamb, so we thought we would create a special blog post highlighting our lamb producers, offerings, and recipes. We’re happy to report that our lamb products come from Missouri and Oregon. All lamb products are 100% grass-fed and grass-finished. They enjoy lush Missouri pastures and plenty of rainfall. We harvest a mix of hair sheep and a special old world breed of wool sheep noted for their meat quality. 

describe the image

We have a variety of grass-fed lamb products available through our online store. We’re thrilled to announce the newest addition to the lamb category - the Lamb Tenderlioin. This cut is second to none in tenderness. Its exquisite taste will have you hooked after just one bite.

What other lamb selections do we offer? We have some real rarities! Think organ meats (Lamb Liver, Kidney, Heart, etc.) and Marrow Bones. We also offer a variety of chops and roasts. Lamb Loin and Rib Chops are a griller's delight. Just fire up the grill and thow on some chops. Another specialty selection is Lamb Tallow. This can be used as an alternative for shortening, lard, or beef tallow. Add it to meat and vegetable dishes for added flavor with all the health benefits grass-fed fat offers. Unfortunately, we do not get tallow with every harvest, so we encourage you to order when it's available. To view all of our lamb selections, please visit our online store.

describe the image

We have a variety of lamb recipes available on our Pinterest page, but we wanted to share a few of our favorites. Here are some tried and true recipes:

- The Domestic Man: Lamb’s Feet Soup and Rolled Lamb Loin Roast

- The Urban Poser: Lamb Lollipops

Slim Palate: Lamb Curry

Balanced Bites: Greek-Style Lamb Meatballs

The Clothes Make the Girl: Moroccan Lamb Kabobs

We welcome your feedback! If you have any lamb recipes or cooking ideas, we'd love to hear them. Feel free to post below or link to any favorite recipes you want to share.

Topics: Recipes, Product Information, Grass-fed Lamb, Our Farms

Native American Bison Stew

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Mon, Apr 22, 2013 @ 11:34 AM

Bison was the most important food to many Native American peoples, and they developed many ways to cook it. One of the most common ways was to make it into a stew, with several root vegetables and broth. It was traditional for large pots of this stew to be kept simmering throughout the day, so anyone who was hungry would have it available. The root vegetables used were usually not the ones that we have available, consisting of things like wild turnips, wild carrots, and other wild roots. But corn was often available, and used in the stews to provide a very nice taste. Sage and wild onions were also often used.

This stew is easy, and is true to the spirit of combining many root vegetables with bison meat. It is also a one-pot meal, containing many nutrients. It does not contain the same root vegetables used by the Native Americans—I use ordinary organic carrots instead of wild carrots, for example. But it is really delicious and satisfying. And tender.

I have found grassfed bison to be a wonderful source of energy, and one of the best remedies for being tired that I have ever found. The precut bison stew meat sold by U.S. Wellness Meats is perfect for this dish.

Grassfed Bison Stew

Serves four.

INGREDIENTS

2 pounds U.S. Wellness Meats bison stew meat

3 organic green onions, chopped

1 tablespoon fresh organic sage leaves, chopped

1 organic yellow onion, chopped

4 large carrots, peeled and chopped

1 cup organic corn kernels, (I use frozen organic corn kernels—no need to defrost them, just break them up into individual kernels)

3 medium potatoes, (or 2 medium sweet potatoes), peeled and chopped into 1-inch chunks

1 1/2 cups U.S. Wellness Meats beef marrow bone stock broth, (or homemade beef or bison broth)

DIRECTIONS

  1. Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. Place all the ingredients in a large covered casserole, and mix well.
  2. Cover the pot and place in the preheated oven. Cook for 30 minutes.
  3. Stir the contents of the pot. Reduce the heat to 250 degrees, and cook covered for 2 hours, or until the meat is tender when pierced with a fork.

fishman 4271 resized 600Stanley Fishman is a cookbook author and blogger who is an expert on cooking grassfed meat. Stanley uses traditional flavor combinations and cooking methods to make the cooking of grassfed meat easy, delicious, and tender. Stanley has written two cookbooks that make it easy to cook grassfed meat —Tender Grassfed Meat: Traditional Ways to Cook Healthy Meat and Tender Grassfed Barbecue: Traditional, Primal and Paleo. Stanley blogs about real food and the cooking of grassfed meat at his blog Tendergrassfedmeat.com.

Topics: Recipes, Product Information

Organ Sausages: General Characteristics, Thawing Tips & Storage

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Mon, Apr 08, 2013 @ 11:35 AM

We get a lot of questions about our wildly popular organ sausages, so we thought we would compile a special blog post to answer the most frequently asked questions. We hope you find this information helpful in choosing the perfect selection for you and your family.

describe the imageOrgan Sausages

-Liverwurst (Ingredients: beef, beef liver, beef kidneys, beef heart, water, sea salt, onion powder, white pepper, coriander, marjoram, allspice)

-Head Cheese (Ingredients: beef, beef heart, beef tongue, water, sea salt, onion powder, white pepper, coriander)

-Beef Braunschweiger (Ingredients: beef, beef liver, water, sea salt, onion powder, white pepper, coriander, marjoram, allspice)

General Characteristics

Head Cheese and Braunschweiger will be milder in taste compared to Liverwurst. Liverwurst has the strongest flavor of all our organ sausages due to the kidneys being a vital ingredient. Weston A. Price members have made our Liverwurst the best selling organ sausage at the annual conference. Overall, it is our best selling organ sausage as well. It is the most diverse in the kinds of organs (liver, kidneys and heart); due to this diversity, Braunschweiger actually contains more liver. 

Head cheese does not contain cheese! Historically, versions have varied greatly by region and culture; our Head Cheese is a simple cold beef sausage which contains heart and tongue.

Color variances are normal for all organ sausages- the outside of the product is typically darker and the inside lighter in color. We do not use any dyes in our products. 

Thawing Tips

You may notice purge or the water that is released every time you freeze and thaw meat. We use none of the phosphorus and dairy binders that the commercial sausage makers use to cover up this issue, so some customers are surprised to find a red liquid upon thawing. Although not the most visually appealing, this is a natural occurrence and no cause for concern.

The Liverwurst will show the most purge as it is richest in the organ meats compared to the Braunschweiger that will have just a bit, and the Head Cheese that rarely has noticeable purge.

The organ sausages are fully cooked and ready to be thawed and enjoyed. Slower thawing in the refrigerator will produce less purge as compared to faster thawing on the counter at room temperature.

organsausages

Storage

Once thawed, the organ sausages will last about a week in the refrigerator as we do not add preservatives or nitrates. If you like, the organ sausages may be partially thawed, portioned and refrozen. We use this method ourselves.

For some customers, organ meats recall flavors they haven't tasted since their childhood; for others, this is an entirely new experience. The palate may take time to adjust to the richness of organ meats. Many customers have commented that pairing the organ sausages with mustard or cheese, drizzling slices with olive oil or even chopping into chunks and using as a salad topping helped make this new flavor more familiar and enjoyable.

Want to learn more creative ways to incorporate organ meats into your diet? Make sure to visit our Offal That's Not Awful! Pinterest Board.

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Recipes, Product Information, Misc Info, Weston A. Price