The Wellness Blog

USWM at Paleo(f)x - Austin, TX

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Jun 10, 2016 @ 04:49 PM

Only a handful of my friends will stomach Liverwurst.

Even fewer when it comes to Pemmican.

What the Paleo f(x) Conference with 5,000 attendees held in store for me completely flipped that standard.

Never, I thought, would I see a child throw a temper-tantrum because their parents would allow them to have ONLY ONE piece of Liverwurst. When this happened, I knew I was with MY people!

Grant with One Stop Paleo Shop Team

Being the only booth with Bacon, you can imagine how popular we were. And how wonderful we made The Palmer Events Center smell! Not only was it delicious, but the accolades we received  due to its lack of ingredients (Pork Bellies & Celtic Sea Salt) could fill a novel:

  • No sugar?
  • No honey?
  • No nitrates or nitrites?
  • Whole30 approved!
  • This is the way Bacon should taste!
  • Nothing but Pork and Hickory Smoke!
  • Reminds me of my Grandmother!

Needless to say, we were out of bacon in less than a day and a half! Note to self: bring more bacon next time!

Of course, we brought more than just Pork Bacon, Pemmican, and Liverwurst. Braunschweiger, Plain & Spicy Beef Jerky, Original, Salt & Pepper, and BBQ Pork Rinds were ready to serve. To the dismay of many, Pork Rinds were gone by the end of the second day! I found a fellow Pemmican addict in Maureen Quinn, who was equally saddened that it needed to be rationed by the third day.

Amanda Love, from The Barefoot Cook (sorry, not the Barefoot Contessa!), was gracious enough to cook up Ribeyes, NY Strips, Top Sirloin, and Leg of Lamb Steaks.

By the end of the conference, everyone knew exactly where the delicious whiff of meat was emanating.

But, I would feel guilty if I didn't tell you about some of our friends that we ran into:

After hours of grazing my way through Paleo f(x), I don't know how I had room for dinner.

What an unforgettable experience; Meeting the members of my Paleo Family to share our passion for this exploding revolution!

Happy Meating!

-Grant D. Cooper

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Pork, Good Fats, Misc Info, US Wellness Meats

Melt In Your Mouth Pork Sirloin Roast

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Dec 18, 2015 @ 06:59 PM
When it comes to the porcine popularity contest, pork sirloin roast rarely gets its due…

It’s no contender to the ever-popular pork shoulder, which is typically used to make classic “pulled” pork. It’s a far cry from crisp and addictive bacon (Hey, even vegans crave it!). And it’s unlikely that many top chefs will choose it over a bone-in chop that requires little more than a quick marinade and a toss on the grill for a succulent and delicious dinner.

Pork sirloin roast is one of those cuts of meat that can be all too easy to ruin. With its low fat content and ample protein, the typical result is dry “cottony” meat that requires extensive use of fatty sauces or gravy to make it palatable.

But I’m here to tell you that pork sirloin roast is an unsung hero! With the right preparation (which I’ll show you below), it can be transformed into one of the most delicious and inexpensive healthy meals your family could enjoy.

Here are just a few benefits of this unloved and underappreciated cut:

1.    It’s Insanely Affordable: Even when you buy the “best of the best” pasture-raised pork sirloin from US Wellness Meats, it only costs around $1.80 per protein-packed 4 ounce serving.  To put that in perspective, a McDonald’s Big Mac provides just 3.2 ounces of hormone and antibiotic-laden conventional beef… at a cost of $3.99.

2.    It’s Packed with Nutrition: A 4-ounce serving of pork sirloin roast contains a mere 160 calories, seven grams of fat and 23 grams of protein. The high protein content will keep you feeling full, stoke your metabolism and boost detoxification. In fact, pork is one of the best sources of the amino acid glycine, an essential “ingredient” in producing your body’s master antioxidant and detoxifier, glutathione.
3.    It’s Perfect for Make-Ahead Meals: When prepared properly, large cuts of meat lend themselves to freezing. That means you can cook once and enjoy multiple “heat-and-eat” meals in the days and weeks after.

Now that you know about some of the unrecognized benefits of pork sirloin roast, I want to share the easiest way to make it succulent, moist and delicious.

Braising: The Saving Grace for Lean Meats

The culinary term “braise” refers to a two-step process of cooking meats and vegetables using both dry and moist heat. Food is first seared in fat at a high temperature. Then it is finished in a covered pot (Dutch oven) with braising liquid and cooked slowly at a lower temperature. The results can be so “fork tender” that meats cooked this way will literally melt in your mouth.

While this age-old technique dates back hundreds of years, braising is culinary chemistry at its finest. By searing meat in fat at high temperature, the exterior of the meat develops a crust. This crust seals in moisture and imparts deep flavor.

Next, using the elements of steam and low heat, muscle meats are cooked slowly and gently. As the muscle fibers slowly break down, the meat is bathed in steam. This helps to drive aromatic compounds deep into the fibers.

The resulting dish is comfort food at its finest. Moist, juicy, tender, flavorful meat that pairs perfectly with a root vegetable puree or cauliflower mashers, accompanied in its own gelatin-rich broth.

You can braise with just about any large cut of meat, using a range of spices and braising liquids. Generally speaking, you want to use a healthy heat-stable fat for the first step. Tallow, lard and coconut oil are great choices, as is duck fat (my favorite).

In addition, a braising liquid that complements your meat is essential. Chicken broth or stock works well for poultry or pork braises. Beef stock works well for beef or bison braises.

Another important element in your braising liquid is the “acid”. Acids break down muscle fibers and help to tenderize meats. It also helps to create balance of the five flavors: sweet, salt, bitter, sour, umami. Acids to consider for your braise include vinegars (apple cider vinegar, white wine vinegar, coconut vinegar), citrus juices (lemon, lime or orange) and wine (white for chicken and pork, red for beef and bison).

Finally, the aromatics. While you can use just about any combination of herbs and spices, I find that making a rub using powdered blends works best. First, its increased surface area means more flavor molecules to contact and penetrate the meat. Also, powders don’t tend to burn as easily as whole herbs. In the recipe below, I use a French-inspired combination of rosemary and fennel.

But don’t stop there - let your palate and your creativity guide you to create your perfect braise!

Now, for the can’t-miss recipe…

Duck-Fat Braised Pork Sirloin Roast with Fennel and Rosemary


•    1 4lb. pasture-raised pork sirloin roast
•    1 Tbsp. dried rosemary
•    2 tsp. garlic powder
•    1 Tbsp. fennel seeds
•    2 tsp. fine sea salt
•    ½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
•    3 Tbsp. pastured duck fat (or coconut oil, tallow or pork lard)
•    3 cups organic chicken stock
•    ½ cup dry white wine (or lemon juice)


  1. In a blender or magic bullet, grind the fennel, garlic, rosemary, salt and pepper to a fine powder.
  2. Place pork sirloin roast on a large piece of cellophane. Sprinkle seasoning all over and rub into the meat. Wrap in cellophane and refrigerate six hours to overnight to infuse with flavor.
  3. Remove pork from cellophane and cut into large chunks (3 ounces each)
  4. Heat the duck fat in a large Dutch oven.* When the fat shimmers, add pork chunks in batches. Do NOT crowd the pan – this will result in steaming, not searing. Sear two minutes per side. Transfer seared pork to a plate and continue with the remaining pork.
  5. Add all of the seared pork back to the Dutch oven and turn heat down to low or simmer. Add the stock and the wine. Stir with a wooden spoon to deglaze the pot. The liquids should come just up to the halfway point of the meat. Cover and simmer, undisturbed, for three hours.

NOTE: If you don’t have a Dutch oven, use a slow cooker for step two of the braising. Simply sear the meat in a sauté pan or skillet, and then transfer the seared meat to the ceramic insert of your slow cooker. Add the broth and wine to the sauté pan to scrape up the fond (or brown bits) from the sautéing step, then pour over the meat in the slow cooker. Typically the “high” setting on a slow cooker translates to about 195 degrees. This may mean you will need to cook the pork sirloin roast longer than if you used a true Dutch oven, but the end result of both cooking methods will be moist and fork tender.


Editorial Note:

Love bread, but not the blood-sugar spiking carbs and grains? Check out Kelley’s newest book, Better Breads, including more than two dozen low-carb, grain-free, prebiotic-rich Paleo breads, biscuits, pancakes, muffins and more! Click here to learn more about Better Breads…

Topics: Pork, US Wellness Meats

Could Garlic Be the Answer to This Global Health Threat?

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Mon, Dec 07, 2015 @ 06:27 AM

Imagine for a moment that you live in a world where a minor and routine surgery puts your life at risk, due to infection… and nothing can be done to save you.kelley herring

Sounds rather extreme, right?

What if, within this same world, one innocent bout of “stomach flu” took down your entire family with no possible way of treating it?

Again, this may sound extreme. Unfortunately, however, this is not a fictional tale. This is the reality of something that is already happening… widespread antibiotic resistance.

The World Health Organization reports that antibiotic resistance is a “serious threat to
global public health”. (1)  And the bacteria that are becoming resistant to antibiotics are not
rarely encountered. They are quite common and are among those that contribute to acne,
gastrointestinal illness, ulcers, stomach cancer and post-surgical infections.

You have probably heard of the ‘hospital superbug’ MRSA. This is a type of ‘staph’ bacteria
that can no longer be treated by the penicillin and cephalosporin classes of antibiotic. This
bacterium can cause infections that are highly contagious and extremely difficult to treat.

Even more common are infections from Campylobacter – the bacteria that is responsible for more than 2.4 million cases of “food poisoning” each year in American alone. And this bacteria is also becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics. (2)

Or, consider Helicobacter pylori. This common bug is present within the digestive track of two-thirds of the world’s population. In normal concentrations within a healthy microbiome, H.
pylori can provide benefits to the host. But it can also multiply out of control. This can
lead to ulcers and even stomach cancer. And this bacteria has also become resistant to
numerous medications. (3)  As a result, it can become a deadly threat.

How Have Humans Created This Global Threat?

… And can we protect ourselves?

The World Health Organization tells us:

“The development of antimicrobial resistance is a natural phenomenon. However, certain human actions accelerate its emergence and spread. The inappropriate use of antimicrobial drugs, including in animal husbandry, favors the emergence and selection of resistant strains.”

Quite simply, it is perfectly natural for bacteria to mutate and become resistant to threats
against them. But this has become pandemic as a result of the:

•    Over-prescription of antibiotics
•    Inappropriate use of antibiotics (failing to finish prescriptions, etc.)
•    Use of antibiotics in raising livestock and poultry

However, there are precautions you can take. And the scientific research has some very
interesting things to say about the anti-microbial effects of common garlic.

Folklore tells us that the “stinking rose” can ward off vampires. Science shows us that it can
kill the microscopic and antibiotic resistant ones!

What Makes Garlic So Effective At Fending Off Microscopic Vampires?

If you’re an avid fan of the health benefits of garlic, you know that its active compound is
an organosulfur compound known as allicin. But you might not know that organosulfur compounds are also found in most antibiotics. Just open a bottle and take a sniff.

The allicin in garlic is highly antimicrobial, as is diallyl sulfide –the breakdown product of allicin.  
But there’s an even more impressive antibacterial compound in the “stinking rose”  called
ajoene. Not only has ajoene been shown to kill Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella
pneumoniae, (4) it has also been shown to effectively eliminate the ‘hospital superbug.’

Researchers from the Department of Bacteriology at the Hirosaki University School of Medicine
tested garlic powder for its antibacterial properties against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and found it to be highly effective. (5)  It is not detailed which of the garlic compounds was tested.

Could Garlic Even Protect Against Food Poisoning?

Researchers from Washington State University researched the effects of diallyl sulfide on
Campylobacter jejuni – one of the most common causes of food poisoning (gastroenteritis). They compared the results to two common antibiotics: ciprofloxacin and erythromycin. They found that the garlic derivative was 100 times more effective on the bacteria than the antibiotics. (6,7)

Our pungent friend also inhibits Listeria and pathogenic E. coli. (8)

So it seems that garlic is not only a tasty additive to food, but also shows great promise as
a food additive to fight bacteria.

Is There A Link Between Garlic, Bacteria And Stomach Cancer?

H. pylori typically lives alongside us happily.  But for some people it can increase the risk
of ulcers and stomach cancer.

An article published in the Journal of Nutrition not only shows us that garlic can eradicate
H. pylori. It also hints that diet high in allium vegetables can be an important protector
against stomach cancer:

“The incidence of stomach cancer is lower in populations with a high intake of allium
vegetables. We have demonstrated in vitro that H. pylori is susceptible to garlic extract at a
fairly moderate concentration. Even some antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains are
susceptible to garlic.”  (9)

Staying Healthy with Garlic… and Ancestral Wisdom

There are many things you can do to minimize your risk of developing an antibiotic-resistant
infection and maintain a healthy level of microbes:

•    Include both cooked and raw garlic as a regular part of your diet, along with onions,
      shallots, leeks and chives. These are all vegetables rich in the sulfur-rich compounds that
      ward off potentially harmful bacteria.
•    Brassica vegetables also contain organosulfur compounds. Include a daily dose of
     organic cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, arugula or bok choy to your         meals. For that extra beneficial bacterial boost, choose lacto-fermented versions like sauerkraut or kimchi.
•    Consume grass fed organic meats, poultry and eggs to reduce your intake of food-
     derived antibiotics.
•    Avoid cross contamination of foodborne bacteria by using different chopping boards for
     meats, poultry and vegetables. Always cook food properly and use sensible hygiene    procedures like washing hands and utensils in between working with meat and vegetables.
•    Use antibiotics wisely and only when necessary. Health guidelines also clearly state
     that finishing your entire dose reduces the risk of antibiotic resistance.
•    Optimize your vitamin D levels through sun exposure or safe supplementation.
•    Be physically active. Not only does this stimulate the immune system and lymph, but
     raising core temperature is important to fend off infections of all kinds.  


Love bread, but not the blood-sugar spiking carbs and grains? Check out Kelley’s newest book,
Better Breads, including more than two dozen low-carb, grain-free, prebiotic-rich Paleo
breads, biscuits, pancakes, muffins and more! Click here to learn more about Better Breads


 World Health Organisation Fact Sheet. Antimicrobial resistance. April 2015.. Accessed December 1 2015.

  Wieczorek, K, Osek, J. Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms among Campylobacter. Biomedical Research International. 2013; Article ID 340605. 

  Megraud, F. H pylori antibiotic resistance: prevalence, importance and advances in testing.
Gut. 2004; 53(9):1374-1384.

  Naganawa, R, Iwata, N, Ishikawa, K, Fukuda, H, Fujino, T, Suzuki, A. Inhibition of microbial
growth by ajoene, a sulfur-containing compound derived from garlic. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 1996; 62(11):4238-4242.

  Sasaki, J, Kita, T, Ishita, K, Uchisawa, H, Matsue, H. Antibacterial activity of garlic
powder against Escherichia coli O-157. Journal of nutritional science and vitaminology. 1999;

  Lu, X, Samuelson, D.R, Rasco, B.A, Konkel, M.E. Antimicrobial effect of diallyl sulphide on
Campylobacter jejuni biofilms. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. 2012; doi:10.1093/jac/dks138

  Washington State University. (2012, May 1). Garlic compound fights source of food-borne
illness better than antibiotics. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 1, 2015

  Kumar, M, Berwal, J.S. Sensitivity of food pathogens to garlic (Allium sativum). Journal of
Applied Microbiology. 1998; 84(2):231-215.

  Sivam, G.P. Protection against Helicobacter pylori and other bacterial infections by garlic.
Journal of Nutrition. 2001; 131(3):1106S – 1108S.

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Pork, Misc Info


Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Jul 31, 2015 @ 07:41 AM

describe the imageThree Meal Planning Tips for the Busy Family

As an aware and health-conscious person, you’re already doing a lot to protect your health by enjoying more nutrient-dense foods and avoiding the added sugar, fake fats and harmful chemicals found in most processed foods. You and your family might even follow specific dietary regimen that works best for you.

Unfortunately, despite our best intentions, it can still be a big challenge to consistently follow a weekly meal plan – and that goes for even the most organized home cook. With jobs, kids, travel and life’s other demands, it is all too easy to deviate from a weekly meal plan, or fail to make one in the first place.

The result?  We succumb to the temptation of unhealthy convenience foods. Or we rely on the same boring go-to meals, week after week. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

With a little forethought, you can prevent dietary pitfalls, while cooking exciting new recipes and getting more diversity in your diet.

Here are three easy-to-follow tips to help you create a flexible, healthy meal plan – without adding a lot of time to your already busy schedule.

Meal Plan Tip #1: Cook Once, Eat Three Unique Meals

We often we think of leftovers as a carbon copy of the meal we ate the day before. But it doesn’t have to be. You can completely transform your previous meal into something entirely new. The key is to choose large cuts of meat and use simple spices that will lend themselves to a variety of cuisines.

Here are a few quick ideas:

•    Pork Sirloin/Shoulder Roast: Roast pork sirloin or shoulder with a simple marinade of salt, pepper, garlic, lemon juice and avocado oil. The first meal can be traditional Pork Roast, served with a side of sweet potatoes and greens. The next several nights can include Pork Carnitas (break cooked pork into chunks and sauté in duck fat)… a Green Coconut Curry with Pork… or a Southern-Style Pork Barbecue with fresh cabbage slaw and Paleo “Cornbread”.

•    Whole Chicken: Using the same simple marinade from above, cook a whole chicken in a pressure cooker or slow cooker. From there, the possibilities are endless. Cobb Salad with pulled or chopped Chicken, Quick Chicken Soup with Zucchini Noodles, Chicken and Mushroom Sauté, Chicken Lettuce Wraps with Asian Dipping Sauce.  

•    Grass-Fed Beef Roast: Choose your favorite grass-fed roast – Eye of Round, Chuck Roast or Bottom Round – and prepare simply. Transform your leftovers into Thai Beef Salad, Chinese Beef & Broccoli or Paleo Tacos.

Meal Plan Tip #2: Have Go-To Meals at the Ready

Life can be unpredictable. Some days you arrive home later than usual, with hungry mouths to feed and nothing at the ready. Worse yet, the family chef may come down with the flu leaving the non-cooking parent at a loss for what to make.

In these cases, having meals fully prepared for your family in advance can save time and stress.

Make some of your favorite freezer-friendly meals in larger quantities for cases like these. And to prevent “freezer forgetfulness” (what IS in there anyway?), keep a running tally of your pre-prepared meals with their dates posted on the fridge or in a kitchen drawer.
Soups, stews and slow-cooked or pressure-cooked meats with their broths make great ready-meals. Also be sure to try US Wellness Meats pre-prepared foods like BBQ Shortribs, Shredded Beef, Pot Roast and Gravy, Sugar-Free Beef Franks and Italian Beef Sausage.

Having these healthy and delicious quick fixes on hand will help the cook in the family rest easy – no matter what life throws in the way!

Meal Plan Tip #3: Prep Ahead and Cook in Bulk

Enjoying a hot Paleo breakfast doesn’t have to mean pulling out the cast-iron skillet every morning. Prepare your staples in advance for the week ahead for a fuss-free pre-work (or school) breakfast.

Cook a batch of Sugar-Free Pork Bacon and Sausage and boil eggs to your desired temperature.   Then simply warm the meat in the toaster oven and serve with pre-cooked eggs for a hot meal in minutes.

When it comes to meal plans, there are many benefits. Not only will you save money and time, but you’ll enjoy more variety in your meals and a greater diversity of nutrients to boot.

I would love to hear from you in the comments below. Have you found a meal planning strategy that works for you? Or do you prefer to “wing” it? If the perfect “done-for-you” meal planning program existed, what features would you most like to see? What benefits would be the most helpful?


EDITOR'S NOTE – Kelley Herring is the author of the brand new book Better Breads – which includes information you need to know about why it is so important to avoid wheat and grains in your diet, plus how to use healthy replacements for these foods to create all the breads you love… without the gluten, carbs and health-harming effects. Click here to learn more about Better Breads…


Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Paleo, Pork, US Wellness Meats

US Wellness Meats Farmers & Partners!

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Wed, Apr 15, 2015 @ 04:40 PM

hen US Wellness Meats was founded back in 2000, we were raising and selling our grass-fed beef products only.  After a few short years in business we realized we needed to widen our horizons as there are so many other great products we could be offering!  So we started to branch out into grass-fed dairy and lamb products, and things continued to grow from there.  We would not be the company we are today without the other amazing farmers and producers who contribute to our business.  Continue reading to learn more about our incredible partners...   

Beef: Our founding farms are located in the heart of the Midwest.  Most of our current production comes from three of the founding members of the company located in Northeast Missouri and West Central Illinois.  Our cattle are 100% grass-fed and grass-finished and do not receive any starch (grains) in their diet.  Every beef product- from the steaks to franks and ground beef meets this same criteria.  We do not feed any antibiotics or hormones and do not use any pesticides or herbicides on our pastures.  Besides our founding farms, we also source from a few private farms throughout the United States and through our partnership with grass-fed farmers in Tasmania.  Currently, our cattle farms are located in Missouri, Illinois, Alabama, Montana, and Tasmania.  We enjoy long summers with abundant rainfall to keep our pastures green most of the year.  We bale plenty of those warm weather grasses in the summer so the cattle enjoy those same grasses when snow is on the ground in the Midwest region. 

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A small group of Tasmanian farmers came to the US for tours of our farms many years ago, which led to the formation of this unique partnership.  Tasmania is the ideal place for grass-fed production due to their temperate climate.  This island is the ideal place for grazing animals as they have a temperate climate and plenty of rainfall that allows for grazing year round, and no hormones or GMOs are allowed on the island.  They are raising their cattle to the exact standards as we are: 100% grass-fed and grass-finished, not fed any antibiotics or hormones, and the farmers do not use any fertilizer or pesticides on their pastures. 
We started sourcing product from Tasmania because there are certain cuts that the animal only has so many of - such as skirts, flanks and hangar steaks, and were always running short.  So we turned to our friends from Tasmania for some of these cuts, which they were able to provide.  These primals are going through the aging process while they are on the ship here, and they are then processed at the same processing facility here in the US as all of our other beef cuts.  If a product is currently sourcing from our Tasmania product, it will have that information on the product description, such as the Flank Steak.  If a product is domestic, it won't have that disclaimer, like the Sirloin Tip Steaks

Click here to learn more about the farm in picturesque Tasmania.   tasmania, grass-fed beef

Bison: Our bison are roaming around the open pastures of the Dakotas and Northern Plains and our farmers there are dedicated to improving the native grasses of the area, and ensuring the natural way of life bison have been accustomed to for decades.  NorthStar Bison in Wisconsin and Wild Idea in South Dakota raise their bison on 100% native prairie grasses, without chemicals, hormones, pesticides or grain.  All our bison is 100% grass-fed and grass-finished.

grass-fed buffalo, grass-fed bison
PorkAll of our pork products are GAP-certified, meaning they are raised in the best conditions possible.  Our pork comes from Heritage Acres which is a group of small, local Missouri and Kansas farmers providing the finest quality, antibiotic-free pork. You can read more details on our pork blog, including information on the pigs diet which is 100% vegetarian feed.  They receive no added hormones and are antibiotic free. 

Since pigs have a single stomach, they cannot be raised on grass along and are supplemented with a conventional, 100% vegetarian diet that includes corn and soy.  Since January 2015, the feed is non-GMO.  All our current inventory is from pigs fed a non-GMO diet.

None of our pork products are processed with or include nitrates or nitrites. 

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Poultry: We source our free range chicken products from a few poultry farms throughout the US .  The free range chickens enjoy plenty of fresh air and sunshine while maturing at their natural pace.  Raising chickens in this way takes a little longer with our birds reach marketable weights in 6-10 weeks as opposed to the industry standard of 6 weeks.  Currently, we source from farms located in: South Carolina (bundles shipped directly from the farm), Arkansas, California, and Florida.

Once mature enough, the chickens are outside on pasture during the day where they can scratch in the soil, eat green plants and whatever bugs they find.  For their protection from predators such as foxes and coyotes, the chickens are moved indoors at night.
Because chickens have a single stomach, they cannot be raised on grass and foraging skills alone.  Their diets are supplemented with a conventional poultry diet which includes corn and soy.  This all natural feed contains no antibiotics, hormones or animal by products.

We have converted nearly all our poultry options to a non-GMO feed ration.  Any selection that is GMO free will specifically be stated in the online description, such as our free-range chicken wings.

Due to growing interest and frequent customer requests, Maypop Farm also started raising soy-free chickens in the summer of 2011.  These selections may be found in our soy free category.  The only soy-free chicken products we currently offer will have "soy free" in the item description and ship directly from our South Carolina poultry farm.  The soy-free chicken feed is non-GMO and does contain corn.  Maypop Farm in Darlington, South Carolina also raises all of our free range 20 pound chicken bundles and ships those direct from the farm

The following poultry options are free range, but not GMO free: South Carolina chicken bundles (except for the Soy Free bundles, which are GMO free) and Chicken Braunschweiger.

The following poultry options are not free range or GMO free: Turkey Jerky, Chicken Sausages, and Turkey Provolone Sausage.  These selections are free roam and antibiotic free from birth.  The diet for these chickens is a conventional poultry diet which includes corn and soy.

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Duck: We source our ducks from upstate New York.  All of our Pekin Ducks are free range and enjoy a diet free of growth hormones and antibiotics. 

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Rabbit: Our rabbits are sourced from a farm in Missouri.  Rabbits are fed pellets containing alfalfa, soybean hull and a mixture of various grains and minerals.  We cannot claim 100% non-GMO for the rabbit feed.  The rabbits are not given growth hormones or antibiotics.

Dairy: We are very lucky to be able to source grass-fed dairy products, without any added growth hormones.  We have two different Amish dairies- one in Indiana, the other in Pennsylvania, who supply us with raw, grass-fed cheese.  The ingredients in our raw cheeses (except unsalted cheddar) are: milk, cultures, sea salt (either Redmond or Celtic - depends on variety), and rennet.  We do not feed any antibiotics or hormones to any of our animals, and all of our cattle - both beef cattle and dairy cows are 100% grass-fed and grass-finished, so they are not consuming any grains throughout their lives.  They are grazing on pastures free of any sprayed fertilizers or pesticides.

The cheeses are not certified organic, but we are sourcing all of them from a group of Amish farmers, raising their animals the same way our ancestors did years ago - very organically, but not certified

Lamb: Our lamb is raised in Oregon and southern Missouri on a 100% grass-fed diet devoid of any chemicals, hormones, pesticides or grain.  The lamb enjoy lush pastures and plenty of rainfall.   

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Seafood: Our seafood products come from Vital Choice located in the state of Washington, one of the premier wild-caught seafood providers in the country.  Their products are certified sustainable, and most products are caught off the west coast and surrounding waters.  The only exception is our wild-caught raw shrimp which are harvested in the Pacific Ocean and processed in the United States. They are wild-caught and chemical free. 
We have carefully collaborated with like-minded farmers and individuals that hold their products to the same standards we believe in for our company.  Long story short, we have built our business over the many years while respecting our animals and our environment.  We enjoy the products, just like our customers, so it remains our goal to offer the best selection possible.  

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Product Information, Pork, Grass-fed Lamb, Seafood, Our Farms, Free-Range Poultry, Misc Info

USWM Pork - 2016

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Tue, Jan 14, 2014 @ 12:58 PM

Thank you for your interest in our pork!

What makes our pork products special?  Lots of things, so we decided to put together a special pork post and update you with exciting news in 2016!

Raised in Missouri, our pigs are sourced from a small cooperative of like-minded farmers.  They are now using the Global Animal Partnership (GAP) 5-Step rating system.  We are really excited about these changes as we are hearing about more and more producers getting involved in the GAP program, and more retailers and consumers paying attention to that label.  To learn more about GAP, please visit their website for a breakdown of the steps, and for details about what producers have to do to stay in the program.

There are five steps in the GAP program.  All new producers have to start out at Step 1, which means they cannot use crates, stalls or cages.  Most of our Step 1 producers actually do have their pigs outdoors, even though this first level does not require it.  Our pork cooperative works with their new producers to help them move up as soon as possible, and make the commitment to move their farm to the next level.  Our co-op works very closely with each farmer to get them to the Step 3 & Step 4 commitment levels (enhanced outdoor access and pasture centered). 


What breeds do you raise?

A mixture of old heritage breeds including: Berkshire, Tamworth, Duroc, Hampshire, Spotted White, and Large Black.

What do they eat? 

Pigs are foragers, and most of our pigs are outdoors every day (weather permitting) to forage for bugs, sticks, roots, etc.  Since pigs have a single stomach, unlike the four chambered stomach of cattle, we cannot raise a healthy animal on grass alone, so their diets are supplemented with corn and soy.  Great news! Since January 2015, the feed is non-GMO again.  As of January 2016, all our pork products are from pigs fed a non-GMO diet.

What about antibiotics & hormones?

We do not feed any antibiotics or growth hormones throughout the life of the animal. 

What about nitrites? 

It is near-impossible to find pork in grocery stores that does not include some type of nitrites or nitrates.  They are usually used in the curing process, and unfortunately have been suggested to be possible carcinogens. Most of the "nitrite-free" pork products are cured with celery salt, however this is another possible danger, as celery salt contains naturally occurring nitrates.  The Weston A. Price Wise Traditions Magazine explored this subject in great depth as related to bacon. While there are countless ways to make bacon - the actual health benefits of this popular product depend on a host of factors, from the raising and processing, down to the cooking process.

The Wise Traditions article suggested that our ancestors had bacon figured out a long time ago.  All it takes is a dry rub (we use sea salt) and a cure (ours cures for 2-3 days) then a slow smoke (our bacon is hickory smoked).  The end result is deep pork flavor, healthy fat, and a new family favorite.

BaconWhat makes our bacon so special?  The only ingredients are pork bellies and sea salt.  That's it - no sugar, maple syrup, spices, honey, or sweeteners of any kind.  We do not use any nitrites, nitrates, celery salt or MSG in the making or processing of the bacon.  We worked specially with Whole30 to develop a sugar-free bacon to meet their program's approval.  After months of trial and testing, we unvieled our new bacon in March of 2012 and it has been a best-seller ever since.  We are very proud to partner with Whole30 for this project!

Since the new bacon went over so well, we have been working on several other pork recipes.  Our Pork Breakfast Sausage is an office-favorite and a staple in our kitchens every morning.  The new recipe contains only: pork, salt, rubbed sage, ground red pepper and black pepper.  No sugars, sweeteners, nitrates, nitrites, or MSG, and the flavor is amazing!  Make sure to check out our Breakfast Favorites category for more wonderful selections like Sugar Free Canadian Pork Bacon Slices.

A holiday favorite is the Sugar-Free Ham.  This petite ham has the same ingredients as the bacon: pork, sea salt and water.  Be sure to check out the Sugar-Free Options section online for more sugar-free choices. 

LardA very popular pork offering is the highly sought after Pork Lard.  After numerous customer requests and a new kettle purchase, we are able to render pork lard now.  Lard is full of healthy fats and a very versatile oil to cook or fry in.  We offer the pork lard in a 2-lb pail.

Our newest additions to the pork department are Pork Rinds!  Fried in our own pork lard, we now offer three varieties: Salt & Pepper, BBQ Spice and Original.  The Original version only contains sea salt and is AIP-friendly!  Whatever your flavor, these are tasty, shelf-stable snacks that both young and old will enjoy.

Looking for pork recipe ideas?  Not sure how long to cook a ham?  Here are some of our favorites pork recipes by some of our favorite chefs:

Citrus Glazed Ham


The Domestic Man: Honey & Citrus Glazed Ham



Black Forest Ham


Against All Grain: Black Forest Ham



Pork Tenderloin


Paleo Cupboard: Stuffed Pork Tenderloin



Honey Baked ham


Civilized Caveman: Honey Baked Ham with Spiced Apples & Peaches



Breakfast Sausage


PaleOMG: Pork Breakfast Sausage




The Domestic Man: Bourbon & Cider Braised Bacon



 Pork Sirloin

The Domestic Man: Roasted Pork Sirloin



Pork Roast


Everyday Paleo: Roasted Garlic & Herb Pork Loin Roast



Topics: Pork, Our Farms

The #1 Kitchen Tool You Need to Save Time and Money this Holiday Season

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Nov 22, 2013 @ 01:10 PM

By: Kelley Herring, Healing GourmetCrockPot

With the holidays upon us, there are two things that most of us could use a lot more of: time and money. Today, I’ll show you how to save both time and money… and still eat like a king.

Unfortunately, many people think that eating right requires an array of chef skills, a big budget and spending hours upon hours in the kitchen. But nothing could be further from the truth.

In fact, with the help of one simple and inexpensive tool, you can feed your family the healthiest foods that money can buy. And you can prepare them in the time it takes to order takeout… for about the same price per serving.

All you need is a slow cooker!

The Easy, Old-Fashioned Way to Be a Great Cook

Slow cookers reached their peak popularity when they were introduced in the 1970s. Nearly every house in the suburbs had a Crock-Pot on the countertop. Over the years, this healthy and super-simple way of cooking became passé.

Thankfully, the versatile slow cooker has made a resurgence in recent years. And for good reason!

With little more than a few cups of liquid or sliced veggies, a sprinkle of seasoning or a pour of sauce, a slow cooker can turn even the toughest cuts of meat into buttery, fork-tender morsels.

Best of all, the slow cooker provides unparalleled convenience. Simply add your ingredients, turn the dial to low and come home to a moist, flavorful, nutrient-rich meal ready to dish up for your family.

Elegant, Fuss-Free Party Fare

And if you’re planning holiday parties this season – don’t overlook the many benefits a slow cooker can provide…

Not only will it free up your oven and stove top for other uses, but using the slow cooker almost guarantees a succulent, fuss-free meal that will take center stage at your table.

From beef and bison… to pork, lamb, chicken (and even seafood!), there’s no limit to the festive and delicious dishes you can create. Here are some of the best cuts of meat (and a few recipe ideas) for your slow cooker:
•    Lamb Shoulder: The rich flavor of lamb is perfect for the low, moist heat in a slow cooker. Add fresh sprigs of rosemary, lemon slices and juice, and chopped garlic for a Mediterranean-inspired meal with just five minutes of prep time.

•    Grass-Fed Beef & Bison Roasts: Make succulent fork-tender beef recipes like Slow Cooker Pot Roast, Slow Cooker Beef Bourguignon, hearty brisket and spiced corned beef, and simple shredded beef for Paleo French Dip Sandwiches with budget-friendly roasts.

•    Grass-Fed Ground Beef: From a delicious Italian meal of Slow Cooker Bolognese with spaghetti squash, to German Meatballs and Cuban Picadillo, the slow cooker will make all of your favorite ground beef recipes simpler… and more delicious.

•    Gourmet Pork Shoulder & Sirloin: From traditional pork barbeque to Slow Cooker Tuscan Pork Loin Roast and Carnitas, all of your recipes using pork shoulder and sirloin turn out moist and juicy.   

And the options don’t end there. Your favorite ribs and chicken drumsticks will be “fall-off-the-bone” tender in the slow cooker. And if you’re a seafood lover, Cioppino and Shrimp Etouffee are two you have to try!

Now that you know the many ways the slow cooker can add more flavor (and precious time!) to your life, here’s another benefit…

Better Flavor, Healthier Meals

Slow cooking actually makes your meals healthier.

That’s right. Cooking protein-rich foods at high temperatures – even for short periods of time – promotes the formation of cancer-causing heterocyclic amines (HCAs).

But cooking in a slow cooker – at or below 212 degrees Fahrenheit – creates negligible amounts of HCAs. Cooking “slow and low” also infuses your meat with wonderful flavor, a tender texture, and mouthwatering moisture.

So now that you know the many culinary options you can create, which slow cooker is the best one to choose?

Choosing the Best Slow Cooker

There are a wide array of slow cookers on the market that will suit your budget and needs. Some are more high-tech with programmable options. Others are extremely simple with simple “low” and “high” settings.

One important factor that many people overlook is the material used in the vessel. Many times it is “non-stick” and contains PFOA/PFTE. You should avoid “non-stick” slow cookers as these compounds are hormone disruptors and are linked with certain types of cancers. You should also avoid using plastic liners. They are marketed as a way to achieve a quick cleanup, but they can also leach dangerous compounds into your food.

Opt for a slow-cooker with a ceramic vessel. This will keep your food free from harmful plastic and non-stick chemicals, while still ensuring a speedy cleanup.  

Another important factor is size. The vessel should be at least two-thirds full during cooking. If it isn’t, the meat will cook too rapidly and the results can be dry and overdone. Consider how many people you typically cook for when purchasing a slow cooker.

Finally, here are a few tips for making all of your slow cooker meals turn out perfectly:

•    Brown First, But Only Sometimes: Browning whole cuts of meat prior to adding to the slow cooker is not necessary. However, searing first in a stable fat (like beef tallow) will help the meat develop more complex flavors. For ground meat, brown prior to adding to the slow cooker. This will prevent clumping and allow the meat to absorb flavors more readily.

•    Go Easy on the Liquids: If you want to try your hand at a slow-cooker version of your favorite stovetop recipe, you will need to reduce the liquid. Slow cookers work by maintaining moisture inside of the sealed vessel, so any extra liquid will pool. A good rule of thumb when adapting your stovetop recipes is to decrease liquids by half.

•    Spice Wisely: Pungent whole spices like cloves, peppercorns, and bay leaves can overpower a dish if they are added at the beginning of the cooking time. Be sure to use them sparingly. On the other hand, ground spices, dried and fresh herbs and citrus juices tend to get “washed out” during the long cooking time. Adding these during the last two to three hours of cooking can help ensure your dish has a fresh, flavorful punch.

•    Seal It Up: If your slow cooker doesn’t seal properly, you may find your meals turn out too dry as much of the moisture can escape during cooking. Put a light coat of oil on the lid and inner rim to help ensure your slow cooker seals in the moisture.
•    No Peeking! While it’s tempting to peek at the mouthwatering progress inside your slow cooker, try to refrain. Each time you open the lid moisture and heat are lost and the required cooking time increases.

Bringing healthy, budget-friendly and delicious meals to the table needn’t be a chore. With a good slower cooker and your favorite cuts of grass-fed meat, poultry and sustainable seafood, you can create amazing dishes for special occasions…and every night of the week.


ED NOTE: Kelley Herring is the Founder and Editor of Healing Gourmet the leading provider of organic, sustainable recipes and meal plans for health and weight loss. Be sure to grab Eating Clean & Saving Green: Your Guide to Organic Foods on a Budget and Eat Your Way Into Shape: Flip Your Body's Fat Blasting Switch and Melt 12 Pounds in 2 Weeks (includes a delicious 7 day meal plan!).  Claim your free copies here...



1.    Vaughn Barry, Andrea Winquist, and Kyle Steenland Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) Exposures and Incident Cancers among Adults Living Near a Chemical Plant Environ Health Perspect; DOI:10.1289/ehp.1306615
2.    Jägerstad M, Skog K. Genotoxicity of heat-processed foods. Mutation Research 2005; 574(1–2):156–172
3.    Sugimura T, Wakabayashi K, Nakagama H, Nagao M. Heterocyclic amines: Mutagens/carcinogens produced during cooking of meat and fish. Cancer Science 2004; 95(4):290–299.

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Paleo, Pork, Grass-fed Lamb, Seafood

Griddle and Grub Giveaway!

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Jun 07, 2013 @ 09:12 AM

We’re kicking off this summer with another giveaway. We all know that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. This time we’ve created a breakfast bundle that’s sure to kick start your day. We’ve paired all of our sugar-free favorites with a Lodge Cast Iron Iron Griddle.

describe the imageReversible Pro Grid Iron Griddle and USWM Sugar-Free Breakfast Favorites (Valued at $150):

-         Pork Bacon

-         Pork Breakfast Sausage

-         Beef Sandwich Steaks

-         Beef Breakfast Sliders (Italian and Polish)

-         Beef Organ Sausages (Liverwurst and Braunschweiger)

Winner will be announced on Thursday, June 13th. Please enter via the widget:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Pork, Misc Info, Contests

Who's Afraid of a Little Fat?

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Wed, Jun 05, 2013 @ 03:57 PM

By: Dr. Al Sears, MDTallow

When I was little, my grandmother’s kitchen was the place to be on Sunday afternoons. That’s when she used to bake pies. She would trim the edges and I got to eat some of the delicious leftovers. Her crusts were second to none.

What was her secret? Homemade pig lard. Good old-fashioned lard is one of the most natural fats. In its unpolluted, unadulterated form it’s also one of the healthiest fats you can eat.

This goes against everything we’ve been told for fifty years. In fact, the diet dictocrats are doing everything they can to ban natural fat from your food because they say it causes heart disease.

Why would they do that? Because natural is not “proprietary.” By proprietary I mean something that they manufacture, patent, trademark, corner the market and sell it to you at a huge profit.

They do this with synthetic fat substitutes…but even before they created synthetic fats they were trying to tell you fat was bad for you. Because carbohydrates are easier to produce cheaply.

Fats in nature have a fixed cost. But carbohydrates…you can grow them in huge quantities, get the government to subsidize and pay you for growing them, and sell them for cheaper than dirt.

That’s what attracted the big food manufacturers to carbohydrate. For example, there’s only about 20 cents worth of wheat in a $4 box of Wheaties. A loaf of white bread has around 15 cents worth of wheat. Peanut butter has maybe 35 cents worth of peanuts.

With fat, it’s hard to make a 5,000% profit like you can selling a box of cereal.

It’s hard to keep perspective with such intense, widespread and effective marketing. I’ve devoted much of my professional career to this subject. I’ve read scores of books on nutrition, I’ve attended multiple conferences and I’m a certified clinical nutritionist. Yet their disinformation campaign is still overwhelming, even to me.

But before you start writing to me telling me how ignorant I am, Let me give you three reasons why telling you not to eat fat anymore is a bad idea. Then I’ll show you the best places to get the healthiest fats.

Reason 1: Fat is one of our three macronutrients.

You need this nutrient to give you energy, maintain your body temperature, transport nutrients, and build a faster brain.

Fat is so important that if your body senses you’re starving, it does everything it can to preserve your fat stores.

Reason 2: We eat less fat than our ancestors and our heart disease rates keep going up.

Reason 3: Saturated fats are a natural part of your diet and they don’t raise your risk of heart disease.

Take a look at the science that backs me up on this.

Contributors to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition did a review of 21 studies and found no evidence that eating less saturated fat lowers your risk of heart disease.(1)

In fact, one study found the opposite. It followed 235 women for over three years and the more saturated fat they ate, the less their arteries got clogged. The women who ate more processed fake fats had the worst progression of atherosclerosis, especially when eating carbs and a lot of high glycemic index foods.(2)

This was backed up by another study that found almost the exact same thing. More saturated fat meant less heart disease.(3)

I tell patients who come to my clinic that I recommend eating as many different natural foods as possible to get the widest variety of healthy fats. You should get at least 50% of your fat from saturated fats.

Here’s a chart I use to give you an idea of which foods have more of the “good” saturated and monounsaturated fats and which have man-made trans-fats:

Fat 1 TBS Saturated Fat (grams) Monounsaturated Fat (grams) Polyunsaturated Fat (grams) Trans Fats
Lard  5.0 5.8 1.4 0.0
Butter  7.2  3.3  0.5 0.0
Margarine (stick)  1.6  4.2  2.4 3.0
Vegetable Shortening  3.2  5.7  3.3 1.7
Olive Oil  1.8  10.0  1.2 0.0
Beef Tallow  6.4  5.4  0.5 0.0
Flaxseed Oil  1.3  2.5  10.2 0.0
Corn Oil  1.7  3.3  8.0 0.0

Also, remember:

  • If you want to try lard, you should get it from natural sources. The lard sold in most grocery stores is typically hydrogenated to give it a longer shelf life. It’s not the real stuff. One rule of thumb: If it’s not refrigerated, you don’t want it.
  • Other good food sources of healthy, natural fats are eggs and nuts.
  • Coconuts have two unique fats – lauric and cupric acid – that are among the heart-healthiest from any food.
  • Stearic acid, which is found in beef and pork, skinless chicken, olive oil, cheese, and chocolate, is one of many saturated fatty acids found in food. Other healthy fats include lauric, myristic and palmitic acids.


Editors Note:  Dr. Al Sears, M.D. is a board-certified clinical nutrition specialist. His practice, Dr. Sears' Health & Wellness Center in Royal Palm Beach, Fla., specializes in alternative medicine. He is the author of seven books in the fields of alternative medicine, anti-aging, and nutritional supplementation, including The Doctor's Heart Cure. To get his free special report on the proven anti-aging strategies for building a vibrant, disease-free life, go here now. You'll learn how to stop Father Time without giving up the foods you love.


1. Siri-Tarino P, Sun Q, Hu F, Krauss R. “Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease.” Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar;91(3):535-46.
2. Mozaffarian D, Rimm E, Herrington D. “Dietary fats, carbohydrate, and progression of coronary atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women.” Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Nov;80(5):1175-84.
3. Griel A, Kris-Etherton P. “Beyond saturated fat: the importance of the dietary fatty acid profile on cardiovascular disease.” Nutr Rev. 2006 May;64(5 Pt 1):257-62.

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Product Information, Pork, Good Fats

Photo of the Day: Happy Pigs

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Wed, Apr 03, 2013 @ 10:33 AM


Happy pigs enjoying a sunny spring day!

Topics: Pork, Our Farms