The Wellness Blog

Could These Farm-Fresh Foods Cause Pain?

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Aug 14, 2015 @ 07:27 AM

Ruby-red tomatoes… crisp bell peppers… spicy-hot cayenne pepper…  nightshade resized 600

For most people, these are garden-fresh ingredients for a healthy diet, rich in a variety of health-promoting nutrients like vitamin C and lycopene. But for others, these seemingly healthy foods can be the cause of pain, migraines, stiffness and systemic inflammation.

Arthritis & The Nightshade Family

As members of the nightshade (or Solanaceae) family of vegetables, tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, peppers and other common foods contain a number of potentially problematic compounds, including glycoalkaloids and steroid alkaloids.

These compounds can inhibit acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme responsible for flexibility of muscle movement. And for some people, consuming these foods can cause stiffness and joint pain related to arthritis.  

Dr. Norman F. Childers, PhD, founder of the Arthritis Nightshades Research Foundation states:

"Diet appears to be a factor in the etiology of arthritis based on surveys of over 1,400 volunteers during a 20-year period. Plants in the drug family, Solanaceae (nightshades) are an important causative factor in arthritis in sensitive people."

In fact, a growing number of doctors and health experts believe that the symptoms of arthritis are often a misdiagnosed reaction to consuming nightshades. What’s more, many people who suffer from other inflammation-related illnesses – such as lupus, rheumatism, fibromyalgia, and musculoskeletal pain disorders – often find relief with a nightshade-free diet.

Take the Nightshade-Free Challenge

It’s important to note that not all people are sensitive to nightshades to the same degree. However, when an inflammatory condition exists, eating nightshades can compound the problem.

If you want to determine if nightshades could be a cause of pain, stiffness or chronic inflammation, you should consider taking a nightshade-free challenge. For three weeks, avoid all nightshade family foods including:


•    Potatoes, all varieties (NOTE: sweet potatoes and yams are not nightshades.)
•    Peppers, all varieties (red, green, yellow, orange, jalapeno, chili, cayenne, pimento.)
•    Tomatoes, all varieties (including Tomatillos)
•    Paprika
•    Eggplant
•    Pepino melon
•    Goji berries
•    Cape gooseberries
•    Ground cherries
•    Garden huckleberries
•    Ashwaganda

It’s also important to avoid foods that contain solanine (one of the steroid alkaloids). These include:

•    Blueberries
•    Huckleberries
•    Okra
•    Artichokes

Some prescription and over-the-counter drugs, homeopathics and other consumables also contain nightshades or solanine. Be sure to read labels and watch for:

•    Belladonna (the deadly nightshade often found in homeopathics)
•    Potato starch in medications and many packaged products
•    Edible flowers including petunia, chalice vine, day jasmine, angel and devil’s trumpets
•    Atropine and Scopolamine (compounds used in sleep aids)
•    Topical capsaicin creams (derived from cayenne)
•    Potato-based vodka

After three weeks, begin to reintroduce nightshades to your diet, one at a time. As you reintroduce these foods, be sure to keep a journal with notes about your symptoms and their severity, including energy levels, pain and stiffness, headaches, etc. Obviously, if you notice an increase in symptoms or severity upon reintroduction of these foods, it is likely that you are sensitive to nightshades and these foods should be avoided.

As the adage goes: "One man's meat is another man's poison." If you are suffering from a pain-related illness, consider a nightshade-free challenge diet. Like many others, you may find a big improvement in your quality of life and a decrease in pain.

Do you have issues with nightshades? If so, what experiences have you had? What benefits have you noticed by eliminating / reducing these foods in your diet?  

_______________________________________________________________________________

ED NOTE
Kelley Herring is the author of the book Better Breads – which includes more information you need to know about why it is so important to avoid wheat and grains in your diet, plus how to use healthy replacements for these foods to create all the breads you love… without the gluten, carbs and health-harming effects. Learn more about Better Breads…

_______________________________________________________________________________

REFERENCES
1.    Smith, Garrett, ND. Nightshades. Problems from these Popular Foods Exposed to the Light of Day. Weston A. Price Foundation. March 30, 2010
2.    N.F. Childers, Ph.D., M.S. Margoles, M.D. An Apparent Relation of Nightshades (Solanaceae) to Arthritis. Journal of Neurological and Orthopedic Medical Surgery (1993) 12:227-231
3.    Childers NF. Arthritis-Childer’s Diet to Stop It. Nightshades, Aging, and Ill Health, 4th ed. Florida: Horticultural Publications, 1993; 19-21.
4.    Patel B, et al. Potato glycoalkaloids adversely affect intestinal permeability and aggravate inflammatory bowel disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2002 Sep;8(5):340-6. PubMed ID: 124796498.
5.    Childers N.F., Russo G.M. The nightshades and health (extensive literature). New Jersey (Somerville) and Florida (3906 NW 31 Pl., Gainesville 32606): Hortic Pub, 1977
6.    D’Arcy WG. Solanaceae: biology and systemics. New York: Columbia University Press, 1985
7.    Heiser CB Jr. The fascinating world of the nightshades, 2nd ed. New York: Dover Publ, 1987

Topics: Heart Health, Misc Info

Paleo Takeout + US Wellness Meats Giveaway!

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Tue, Jun 23, 2015 @ 09:26 AM

 Hello real foodies! 

***Don't miss an exclusive recipe and giveaway at the end of this post.***

describe the image

We've known home chef, blogger, and cookbook author Russ Crandall (aka- The Domestic Man) for many years. Like us, Russ believes in an ancestral, whole foods way of eating. We are so thrilled to share the release of his second cookbook, Paleo Takeout. Available today, June 23rd!

Before we get to the giveaway, Russ has generously agreed to let us share a NEW recipe that can only be found in Paleo Takeout. It's one of our favorites, and we're sure you'll love it too!

______________________________________________________________________________

SWEET AND SOUR CHICKEN

1IM8vQwcDJG8maMqWrMsah56juF8Mv0nILWJzesdueE resized 600SAUCE:

  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 3 tbsp honey
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste 
  • 1 tbsp tamari
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/4 tsp white pepper

NUGGETS:

  • 2 tbsp expeller-pressed coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup tapioca or arrowroot starch
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp white pepper
  • 2 lbs boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into bite-sized chunks
  • 2 large eggs, beaten

SLURRY:

  • 1 tbsp arrowroot starch
  • 1 tbsp cold water
  • 1/2 tsp sesame seeds, to garnish
  • 2 green onions, sliced, to garnish

- In a saucepan, combine the sauce ingredients. Bring to a simmer over medium-low heat, then reduce the heat to low to gently simmer as you prepare the rest of the meal; stir occasionally.

- Preheat your oven to 250°F. In a wok or skillet, warm the coconut oil over medium heat. Combine the tapioca starch, salt, and pepper, then toss the chicken pieces with the starch mixture. With your fingers, dip a starchy chicken piece in the beaten eggs, shake off the excess egg, and then add to the oil. Repeat until you have filled your skillet, being careful not to overcrowd the chicken pieces. Fry the chicken until cooked through, flipping every 2 minutes, about 6 to 8 minutes per batch. As you finish each batch, place the cooked pieces on a plate lined with paper towels; put them in the oven to stay warm. You should be able to cook the chicken pieces in 3 or 4 batches, depending on the size of your skillet.

- Once the chicken is cooked through, finish the sauce. Taste the sauce and add more salt or pepper if needed. If the sauce is too dark and strong tasting, add a little chicken broth to thin it out. At this point, the sauce should be about as thick as tomato soup and should have a sharp but not overwhelming flavor.

- In a small bowl, stir together the arrowroot starch and cold water to create a slurry. Raise the sauce temperature to medium; once bubbling, add half of the slurry and stir until thickened, adding more slurry if needed. Remove from the heat.

Toss the chicken pieces with the sauce, then garnish with sesame seeds and green onions. Serve over Basic Steamed Rice (page 286) or Cauliflower Rice (page 288).

* Consider adding chunks of onion, bell pepper, or even pineapple to enhance the flavor of this dish. These ingredients should be added with the starch slurry in step 4.

* This dish is equally delicious made with sliced pork loin or shrimp.

______________________________________________________________________________

HERE'S YOUR CHANCE TO WIN!

We're pairing Paleo Takeout with a $150 US Wellness Meats gift certificate to give to one of our loyal followers. 

Enter via the widget below: 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Thanks for participating!

Topics: Paleo, Misc Info, Contests

How Gluten Promotes Chronic Disease (Even if You are NOT Gluten Sensitive)

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Sat, Jun 20, 2015 @ 01:41 AM

Author: Kelley Herring   Author: Kelley Herring

If you are a student of health and nutrition, then you’ve certainly heard a lot about the benefits of a gluten-free diet over the last several years. In fact, there is a good chance that you have made the choice to eliminate grains and gluten from your own diet.

But you’re probably also familiar with the backlash against this way of eating from a few vocal bloggers, journalists, doctors and possibly even your own friends and family. I recently came across an article in Time, with the title, “Eat More Gluten, The Fad Must Die.” The same day, I received an email with the subject line, “99% of People Should Stop Eating Gluten Free.”                      

Many of these critics claim that a gluten-free diet will cause you to miss out on critical nutrients. Others claim that a grain-free diet is only necessary for the less than one percent of the population (two to three million Americans) who suffer from Celiac disease. For anyone else, they claim, a gluten-free diet is but a waste of time and money, with no particular benefit.

Today, I’ll show you why these conclusions are reckless and unfounded. I will also show you why a grain-free diet is critical to your long-term health – even if you’re able to consume foods containing gluten with no apparent adverse effects.

So, let’s begin with the facts…

It is quite easy to refute the claim that, “99 percent of people should stop eating gluten free.” This is based on the logical fallacy fact that less than 1 percent of the people in the U.S. are currently diagnosed as Celiac. Of course, it does not account for those who have the disease and have not been diagnosed. More importantly, it excludes the additional 18 million Americans (at least) known to suffer from gluten sensitivity – a heightened immune response to gluten that causes discomfort and a wide range of systemic effects.

But research continues to mount that gluten is NOT the only problematic compound in cereal grains. Furthermore, we are discovering that the immune response that gluten elicits in some people – most notably Celiacs – is not the only health issue to be concerned about.

New research, published by Dr. Alessio Fasano at Harvard, confirms that gluten-containing foods impact the health of ALL who consume them, by increasing the risk of a “leaky gut.”

Gluten:  The Loaded Gun for a Leaky Gut (and Brain)

Dr. Fasano discovered that exposure to gliadin – a protein found in gluten -- increases the permeability of the epithelial lining of the gut. And this happens in healthy subjects, as well as those with Celiac.

A healthy gut plays a critical role in the function of your immune system. Of course, it also helps to extract nutrients from your food, allowing these compounds to enter the bloodstream where they can nourish your body. But the gut also serves as a critical barrier. It is supposed to block harmful substances and undigested food particles from entering the bloodstream.

However, when the small spaces between gut cells (called tight junctions) expand, a wide range of substances that would never pass through a healthy gut into the bloodstream are allowed to pass right through.

What’s more, consumption of gliadin was ALSO found to increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, allowing proteins, viruses, bacteria and toxins in the blood to breach this normally safeguarded space.

As you can imagine, a “leaky” gut and brain have been linked to a host of seemingly unrelated symptoms and chronic diseases including (but certainly not limited to):
●    Rheumatoid arthritis
●    Food allergies
●    Asthma
●    Eczema
●    Inflammatory bowel disease
●    Lou Gehrig’s disease
●    HIV
●    Cystic Fibrosis
●    Diabetes
●    Autism
●    ADHD
●    Alzheimer’s disease
●    Parkinson’s
●    Brain fog and fatigue

While these conditions may seem disconnected, they share a common root:  Inflammation.

In fact, Dr. David Perlmutter, M.D., renowned neurologist and the author of Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain for Life says:

“In millions of people today, the gut is largely disrupted by increased intestinal permeability  which fuels a continuous state of low-grade inflammation.”

Gluten Promotes Inflammation: The Cornerstone of Chronic Disease

Among the substances that leak into the bloodstream from the gut, one of these is particularly nefarious: lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

LPS is a compound that makes up the outer membrane of certain types of bacteria in the gut. These bacteria normally live within the confines of your gut without issue. But when they pass through the gut into the bloodstream – where they don’t belong – they cause a sharp inflammatory response.

In fact, LPS is so inflammatory that it is actually used experimentally in the lab to create inflammation.

A leaky gut will increase the amount of LPS that circulates in your blood. Systemic inflammation (including brain inflammation) and an increased risk of disease is the inevitable result.

(NOTE: You can test your levels of LPS, and therefore your degree of gut permeability, with a test called the Cyrex Array 2. The test costs around $200.)

Heal Your Gut and Reduce Inflammation with a Gluten Free Ancestral Diet

Research now shows that gluten can cause long-term health consequences… even in the absence of gluten sensitivity or Celiac disease.

Focus your diet on the nutrient-dense foods our ancestors enjoyed – including gut-healing foods like bone broth and saturated fats from animals raised on pasture – to help seal and heal your gut and reduce the systemic inflammation associated with chronic disease.

Do you have any experience with leaky gut? If so, how did you heal it?

Editor’s Note
Kelley Herring is the author of the new book Better Breads – which includes more information you need to know about why it is so important to avoid wheat and grains in your diet, plus how to use healthy replacements for these foods to create all the breads you love… without the gluten, carbs and health-harming effects. Click here to learn more about Better Breads…

REFERENCES
1.    Jargon, Julie. “The Gluten Free Craze: Is It Healthy?” Wall Street Journal. June 22, 2014  
2.    Kluger, Jeffrey. “Eat More Gluten; The Fad Diet Must Die”. Time Magazine. June 23, 2014
3.    Perlmutter, David. Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain for Life. Little, Brown and Company; 1 edition (April 28, 2015)
4.    Fasano A.Intestinal permeability and its regulation by zonulin: diagnostic and therapeutic implications.Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2012 Oct;10(10):1096-100. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2012.08.012. Epub 2012 Aug 16.
5.    Fasano A .Zonulin and its regulation of intestinal barrier function: the biological door to inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer.Physiol Rev. 2011 Jan;91(1):151-75. doi: 10.1152/physrev.00003.2008.
6.    Groschwitz KR1, Hogan SP.Intestinal barrier function: molecular regulation and disease pathogenesis.J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Jul;124(1):3-20; quiz 21-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2009.05.038.
7.    Turner JR.Intestinal mucosal barrier function in health and disease.Nat Rev Immunol. 2009 Nov;9(11):799-809. doi: 10.1038/nri2653.
8.    Drago S, El Asmar R, Di Pierro M, Grazia Clemente M, Tripathi A, Sapone A, Thakar M, Iacono G, Carroccio A, D'Agate C, Not T, Zampini L, Catassi C, Fasano A. Gliadin, zonulin and gut permeability: Effects on celiac and non-celiac intestinal mucosa and intestinal cell lines. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006 Apr;41(4):408-19.
9.    Lammers KM1, Lu R, Brownley J, Lu B, Gerard C, Thomas K, Rallabhandi P, Shea-Donohue T, Tamiz A, Alkan S, Netzel-Arnett S, Antalis T, Vogel SN, Fasano A. Gliadin induces an increase in intestinal permeability and zonulin release by binding to the chemokine receptor CXCR3. Gastroenterology. 2008 Jul;135(1):194-204.e3. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2008.03.023. Epub 2008 Mar 21.

Topics: Misc Info

Strongwoman Maureen Quinn!

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Jun 19, 2015 @ 11:04 AM

They say that good things come in small packages...Maureen Quinn might say that about the US Wellness Meat shipments that she gets as she’s training. We definitely say that about her! Featherweight competitor, Maureen will be representing US Wellness Meats in the United States Strongman National Championships next weekend. We are very excited to have her on board with the US Wellness Meats team, and wish her the best of luck as she competes for a National Championship!

log pose resized 600

Q: How did you get started in Strongman Competitions?

I’ve been a runner my whole life. I fell in love with the simplicity of it. Once I graduated, and began working full time as a microbiologist, it became harder to motivate myself to go out and run “an easy 12 miler.” I am big on health and staying in shape so I wanted to try something new.

I joined GrassFed CrossFit with a bunch of my running girlfriends. My coach insisted I had potential to be super strong, and I thought he was crazy. Eventually, I agreed to start his strength-biased weightlifting program. Within weeks my body underwent a transformation like I had never experienced before. The allusive lean “bikini figure” I had been chasing in my endless cross country running, was hiding in heavy weightlifting all along.

I was then introduced to the sport of Strongwoman, the female counterpart to the televised “World’s Strongest Man” on ESPN. I learned that it wasn’t only burly men who could pick up cars and press tree trunks above their heads. I entered my first competition in August of 2014, shocking everyone with a first place finish in the featherweight division. The win qualified me for the North American Strongwoman Championships held in Reno, Nevada.

Two months later, I’m on stage pitted against the world’s strongest females in contention for the Championship title. Although I didn’t leave with the gold medal I was ecstatic to be officially ranked as the 6th strongest female in the nation under 120 lbs, especially considering I didn’t know what Strongwoman was four months prior. This month, I’m headed to the 2015 United States Strongwoman National Championships stronger and more motivated than ever before.

Q: How did you learn about grass-fed beef?

I learned about grass-fed meats from my coach Chad, the owner of GrassFed CrossFit. Actually, I learned about MEAT from my coach Chad. Before I started lifting weights my diet was heavy in fruits and vegetables. Like most girls growing up, I was never satisfied with my body. Chad put me on a high-fat, paleo based, grass-fed diet. He made it seem necessary for my training, but it really had an impact on my overall health. This was scary (I had a slight meltdown the first time I ate real cheese again) because I was so sure that eating fat would make me fat.

Coupled with the weight training, my body changed instantly. I was a distance runner my whole life, yet somehow my body fat decreased. I had become the leanest I’d ever been after eating all the fat I wanted. I was also introduced to amazing meats that I never would have considered trying before, like beef cheeks and head cheese. I got to cook all my veggies in butter and cover my burgers with cheese. My workouts began improving and most importantly I learned what it was like to feel healthy. I now realize why I always felt tired and hungry when I was eating like a vegetarian.

Chad also introduced me to what he considered “the best offering of quality, variety, convenience, and pricing in the grass-fed world,” US Wellness Meats. And after my first experience with their products, I couldn’t agree more! The majority of people, both athletes and non-athletes, are lacking quality saturated fat in their diet. The problem is exacerbated by the lack of grass-fed fats being offered in local grocery stores. Fortunately I’m able to have grass-fed pemmican, tallow, marrow, cheese, and bacon delivered right to my door.

Q: What is your favorite meal to cook using grass-fed beef?

My new diet has turned me into a self-proclaimed chef! I usually find a cool recipe on a paleo blog and try to recreate it. I stick to the most wholesome and simple ingredients (meat!) and stay away from metabolically incongruent food sources our nomadic ancestors wouldn't eat (no matter how much we try to pretend they could have).

I fry a lot of the food I eat in beef tallow, anything from meat to fish to sweet potatoes. My carbohydrates for the day normally consist of plantain chips fried in beef tallow and dipped in grass-fed sour cream or butter. It never gets old, trust me. I like to try a lot of different cuts of meat, but the 75/25 ground beef is my favorite. It’s the simplest way to make a delicious dinner when I get home late from the gym. The high fat content gives it great flavor.

Currently, my favorite recipe is zoodles with avocados and liverwurst. I make “zoodles” by running a zucchini (or two) through a spiralizer. Next, I sauté the zoodles in a pan with grass-fed butter, avocado, onions, and various spices. After about 10 minutes, I add the liverwurst and let it cook another few minutes. It’s sort of a weird creation, but the liverwurst gives my zoodles immaculate flavor, and it is incredibly nutrient dense.

My ABSOLUTE favorite snack is sugar-free pemmican bars. I love telling people that it's just meat and fat. They think I'm strange until they try it. It's even good a little frozen; I discovered this because I was too impatient to let it to defrost.

Q: How do you prepare for a competition?

My training is relatively the same year round. There's nothing more important than building fundamental strength. Once you've built strength, accessory work is necessary, but in Strongwoman you should really focus on being strong. A week or two before competition I’ll work on technical components of the lifts for the specific event. I’ll only lift heavy once during the week of a competition so that I’m well rested beforehand. I always pack all of my food in a big cooler and get a hotel room with a kitchen so that I can cook my own meals. I don't eat out and I want to be able to fuel myself with the best food possible before a competition. Pre-cooked foods like summer sausage and pemmican come in handy when I don’t have the best accommodations for preparing foods.

Q: What's your favorite lift/event in competition?

My favorite lift is most certainly a deadlift. Mentally, it’s pretty simple. Either you can pick the weight up or you can't. Everyone that trains with me knows that my ideal workout is deadlifts and box jumps. Box jumps aren't exactly a Strongwoman event but I practice other movements to make sure I stay a well-rounded athlete. It's sort of funny; statistically the deadlift is probably my worst event in Strongwoman competitions, but I still love it.

My favorite event during my Strongman journey was without a doubt, the wheelbarrow carry at Nationals. My wheelbarrow weighed 1000 pounds…so naturally I didn't think I'd be able to pick it up. I almost started laughing during the event. Once I picked it up and started moving, all I was thinking was "Oh my gosh, how do I stop now?" It was a lot of fun. My favorite aspect about it is that I can now say I've lifted 1000 pounds.

Thanks for reading! To follow Maureen's progress, click here

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Misc Info, Exercise

FLAVOR YOUR MEALS WITH THESE LOW-CARB PALEO SAUCES

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, May 08, 2015 @ 11:50 PM

describe the image

If you’ve been eating a Paleo diet for some time, you may find that your usual meal rotations of meat and vegetables can become… well, a little boring.

But there’s a fast and easy way to dress up all of your favorite meals without much extra effort: Sauces.

As you probably know, most store-bought sauces and dressings should be avoided. These usually contain corn syrup or other hidden sugars, as well as unhealthy fats and oils (ie. Corn, soybean, vegetable oils, etc.). Of course, many folks shy away from making sauces at home. They think sauce-making is complicated, time-consuming and best left to classically-trained chefs.

But the truth is there are many simple sauces you can whip up in less than five minutes that will add extraordinary flavor, healthy fats and nutrients to all of your favorite standbys.

Today I’m going to share five Paleo-friendly, low-glycemic, no-cook sauces that will transform your everyday meals into restaurant-quality creations:

Paleo Sauce #1 – Pesto and Pistou

Originating from Genoa, this classic sauce is traditionally made with fresh basil, garlic, pine nuts and either Parmigiano-Reggiano (Parmesan cheese) or hard sheep’s cheese. These ingredients are usually blended with olive oil. The French version (pistou) is made with olive oil, basil, and garlic only.

You can create your own favorite version of pesto (or pistou) using different nuts (Brazil nuts are delicious in pesto and provide a superior source of selenium) and hard cheeses (if tolerated). Fresh pesto is the perfect complement to grilled wild salmon or halibut, shrimp and pastured chicken.

Paleo Sauce #2 – Chermoula

This spice-infused North African herb sauce is a staple of Moroccan cuisine. It is traditionally made with cilantro, garlic, coriander, smoked paprika, chili paste, lemon and olive oil. Chermoula has powerful detoxifying properties thanks to cilantro, which binds to heavy metals and carries them out of the body.  Use chermoula as a marinade or spoon liberally over wild fish, grass-fed steaks, grilled lamb and roasted chicken. (Need a recipe? Check out David Lebovitz’s Chermoula.)

Paleo Sauce #3 – Remoulade

Remoulade is a classic French mayonnaise-based condiment that is used worldwide in a variety of cuisines. Similar to tartar sauce, remoulade is often flavored with curry, mustard, horseradish, paprika, capers, diced pickles or shallots, depending on the origin. Create your own version using simple homemade Paleo mayonnaise (made with avocado oil) or Mark Sisson’s newest creation Primal Kitchen Mayo, and whisk in your favorite flavor combinations. For wild salmon and other seafood, I like minced shallot, capers, horseradish and lemon. For grass-fed meats and pastured lamb, try robust-flavored smoked paprika and cayenne.

Paleo Sauce #4 – Harissa

Another North African sauce, harissa is spicy, garlic-infused chile paste that can be used to enliven just about any meat or vegetable. Be sure to opt for organic chile peppers, as this is a crop that is heavily sprayed with pesticides. (Here’s a great harissa recipe from Saveur)

Paleo Sauce #5 - Romesco

Last but not least is the nut and red pepper-based Spanish sauce, romesco, made with roasted red peppers, raw nuts (almonds or hazelnut are traditional), roasted garlic and olive oil. Historically used to accompany fish, romesco is also delicious on pastured chicken and lamb. To make a quick superfood version at home, puree organic roasted red peppers (try Mediterranean Organic, sold in glass jars already roasted) and Brazil nuts with high quality olive or avocado oil and roasted garlic.

Pack more flavor, antioxidants and interest into your Paleo meals with these simple, healthy sauces. They’re quick to whip up, require only a few basic kitchen tools, and will keep for several days in the refrigerator.

Do you have a favorite Paleo sauce recipe? We’d love for you to share it here!

ED NOTE: Kelley Herring is the author of Better Breads – which includes information you need to know about why it is so important to avoid wheat and grains in your diet, plus how to use healthy replacements for these foods to create all the breads you love… without the gluten, carbs and health harming effects. Click here to learn more about Better Breads…

REFERENCES
1.    Pesto Genovese: an Ageless Benchmark of Great Italian Cuisine.
2.    “Chermoula”. David Lebovitz.com. Web. May 4, 2015.
3.    Prosper Montagné (1961). Charlotte Snyder Turgeon & Nina Froud, ed. Larousse gastronomique: the encyclopedia of food, wine & cookery. Crown Publishers. p. 861. ISBN 0-517-50333-6..
4.    Aga M, Iwaki K, Ueda Y, Ushio S, Masaki N, Fukuda S, Kimoto T, Ikeda M, Kurimoto M. Preventive effect of Coriandrum sativum (Chinese parsley) on localized lead deposition in ICR mice. J Ethnopharmacol. 2001 Oct;77(2-3):203-8.
5.    Omura Y, Beckman SL. Role of mercury (Hg) in resistant infections & effective treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis and Herpes family viral infections (and potential treatment for cancer) by removing localized Hg deposits with Chinese parsley and delivering effective antibiotics using various drug uptake enhancement methods. Acupunct Electrother Res. 1995 Aug-Dec;20(3-4):195-229.
6.    Karunasagar D, Krishna MV, Rao SV, Arunachalam J. Removal and preconcentration of inorganic and methyl mercury from aqueous media using a sorbent prepared from the plant Coriandrum sativum. J Hazard Mater. 2005 Feb 14;118(1-3):133-9.

Topics: Paleo, Misc Info

Nutrient Density: The Key to Youth and Beauty

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Apr 24, 2015 @ 01:17 AM

describe the imageDo you want smoother skin, more lustrous hair, stronger nails and a youthful glow? Who doesn’t?

In our modern world of uber-expensive creams, potions and procedures, many of us are willing to spend big bucks when it comes preserving or regaining our youthful looks. But the secret to looking young and vibrant doesn’t come in a fancy package. It doesn’t require needles, syringes and scalpels. And it won’t cost you a lot of money, either.

The key to looking vibrant at any age lies in the nutrient-dense diet of our ancestors.

The Ancestral Answer to Beauty and Bulletproof Health

The attributes we find attractive are also those correlated with good health and fertility. So maximizing nutrition won’t just make you healthier on the inside… but more beautiful on the outside too.

Your body is intelligently designed to prioritize the nutrients we have available. When you are deficient, your body will preferentially use nutrients for mission-critical biological processes like brain function, blood building and wound healing.

This is critical for survival. But it’s bad for your appearance, as you hair, skin and nails take a back seat in line for nutrients. If you’re lackluster in these departments, it’s a good indication that you are not getting the nutrients you need.

The good news is that following a Paleo diet can help…

Beauty Superfoods: Five Key Nutrients to Enhance Your Looks


By enjoying a wide variety of highly nutrient-dense foods – including healthy fats, clean protein, connective tissue, organ meats and bone – you provide your body with an unparalleled source of beauty-enhancing nutrients including collagen, zinc, biotin, vitamin A and omega-3 fats.

Eating ancestrally also eliminates or minimizes inflammatory compounds (like omega 6 fats from industrial seed oils), nutrient thieves (like phytates from grains) and DNA toxins (like sugar) that damage cells, bind up nutrients and promote the cross-linking of proteins that can lead to wrinkle formation.

Of course, it goes without saying that your diet should also include a wide variety of colorful, non-starchy vegetables, nuts and berries. These foods provide powerful phytonutrients and antioxidant protection that promote health and slow down the aging process.

So, let’s take a look at five key beauty nutrients and the best foods to optimize them in your diet:

  • Collagen: This protein, found in connective tissue, has the unique ability to be deposited where you need it. That means dietary collagen can actually add cushion to your hips and knees or help to fill in fine lines and wrinkles on your face. Eating meat on the bone and making bone broth a staple of your diet are the two best ways to top off your supply of this superfood beauty nutrient.
  • Zinc: You probably know this mineral best for its important role in growth, healing and immunity. But a deficiency in zinc (often due to inadequate dietary consumption or binding with phytate-rich grain foods) can result in thinning hair and skin problems, including acne. Get more zinc in your diet with oysters, grass-fed beef (short ribs and ribeyes are especially rich in zinc), lobster, shrimp, pork, beef liver, lamb and egg yolks.
  • Biotin: This beauty nutrient is essential for hair growth and strong, healthy nails. The most concentrated sources of biotin are egg yolks and liver, with ample amounts in wild salmon, sardines, and chicken.
  • Vitamin A: You’ve probably seen synthetic vitamin A creams and supplements – prescription or over-the-counter – marketed as a potent remedies for wrinkles. While these substances can help to prevent wrinkles and combat acne (thanks to their ability to boost cell turnover and increase collagen production), they also come with a list of potential side effects. Eating vitamin A rich foods – including beef liver, chicken liver, egg yolks, wild salmon and mackerel – can provide your body with this powerful anti-aging vitamin – without the unwanted side effects. 
  • Omega-3 Fats: Found primarily in wild game and seafood and meat from animals raised on pasture, omega-3 fats provide powerful protection against inflammation – a key disease process that promotes physical aging. Boost your intake of omega-3s with wild salmon and halibut, sardines, mackerel, wild shrimp and scallops and a high quality fish oil supplement.

Optimizing Your Nutrition for Beauty… and Beyond


To get the full spectrum of nutrients you need for optimal health, vary your diet. Try duck liver and bison liver… use bison marrow bones or  chicken feet for collagen-rich stocks… enjoy halibut and lobster in addition to your usual seafood meal of wild salmon.

Enjoying delicious meals that include these nutrient-dense superfoods, coupled with a variety of non-starchy vegetables, is not just the best way to fortify your health… but also your appearance!

ED NOTE: Kelley Herring is the author of Better Breads – which includes information you need to know about why it is so important to avoid wheat and grains in your diet, plus how to use healthy replacements for these foods to create all the breads you love… without the gluten, carbs and health-harming effects. Click here to learn more about Better Breads

REFERENCES

  1. Shanahan, Catherine MD., Shanahan, Luke.  Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food. 2009
  2. USDA National Nutrient Database
  3. “How Paleo Makes You Look Younger, Sexier and More Vibrant”. ChrisKresser.com. Web.  14 Feb. 2014

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Product Information, Misc Info

US Wellness Meats Farmers & Partners!

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Wed, Apr 15, 2015 @ 04:40 PM

When US Wellness Meats was founded back in 2000, we were raising and selling our grass-fed beef products only. After a few short years in business, we realized the need to widen our horizons as there are many other great products we could be offering! We started to branch out into grass-fed dairy and lamb products and things continued to grow from there. We would not be the company we are today without the other amazing farmers and producers who contribute to our business. We invite you to continue reading to learn more about our incredible partners...   

Beef: Our founding farms are located in the heart of the Midwest. Most of our current production comes from farms operated by three of our founding members. These farms are located in Northeast Missouri and West Central Illinois. Our cattle are 100% grass-fed and grass-finished and do not receive any starch (grains) in their diet. Every beef product- from our steaks to our franks and ground beef- meets this same criteria. We do not feed any antibiotics or hormones to our cattle and no pesticides or herbicides are used on our pastures. Besides our founding farms, we also source from a few private farms throughout the United States and through our partnership with grass-fed farmers in Tasmania. Currently, our cattle farms are located in Missouri, Illinois, Alabama, Montana, and Tasmania. We enjoy long summers with abundant rainfall to keep our pastures green most of the year. We bale plenty of those warm weather grasses in the summer so the cattle still enjoy those same grasses when snow is on the ground in the Midwest region. 

266498 10151108248374895 479560845 o resized 600

A small group of Tasmanian farmers came to the US for tours of our farms many years ago, which led to the formation of this unique partnership. Tasmania is the ideal place for grass-fed production due to their temperate climate. This island is the ideal place for grazing animals, as they have a temperate climate and plenty of rainfall that allows for grazing year round. No GMOs are allowed on the island. They are raising their cattle to the exact standards as we are: 100% grass-fed and grass-finished, not fed any antibiotics or hormones, and the farmers do not use any fertilizers or pesticides on their pastures. 
 
We started sourcing product from Tasmania because there are certain cuts that the animal only has so many of - such as skirts, flanks and hangar steaks. Our continuous shortages caused us to reach out to our friends from Tasmania for some of these cuts, which they were able to provide. These primals go through the aging process while they are on the ship here, and they are then processed and packaged with our other raw beef cuts here in Missouri. If a product is currently sourced from Tasmania, it will have that information on the product description, such as the Flank Steak. If a product is domestic, it won't have that disclaimer, like the Sirloin Tip Steaks

Click here to learn more about the farm in picturesque Tasmania.   tasmania, grass-fed beef

Bison: Our bison roam the open pastures of the Dakotas and Northern Plains where these farmers are dedicated to improving the native grasses of the area and ensuring the bison's natural way of life. NorthStar Bison in Wisconsin and Wild Idea in South Dakota both raise their bison on 100% native prairie grasses, without chemicals, added hormones, pesticides, or grain. All our bison is 100% grass-fed and grass-finished.

grass-fed buffalo, grass-fed bison
PorkAll of our pork products are GAP-certified, meaning they are raised in the best conditions possible. Our pork comes from Heritage Acres which is a group of small, local Missouri and Kansas farmers providing the finest quality, antibiotic-free pork. You can read more details on our pork blog, including information on the pigs diet which is 100% vegetarian feed. They receive no added hormones and are antibiotic free. 

Since pigs have a single stomach, they cannot be raised on grass alone so their diet is supplemented with a conventional, 100% vegetarian diet that includes corn and soy. Since January 2015, the feed is non-GMO. All our current inventory is from pigs fed a non-GMO diet.

None of our pork products are processed with or include nitrates or nitrites. 

130402d resized 600
Poultry: We source our free range chicken products from a few poultry farms throughout the US. The free range chickens enjoy plenty of fresh air and sunshine while maturing at their natural pace. Raising chickens in this way takes a little longer with our birds reach marketable weights in 6-10 weeks as opposed to the industry standard of 6 weeks. Currently, we source from farms located in: South Carolina (bundles shipped directly from the farm), Arkansas, California, and Florida.

Once mature enough, the chickens are outside on pasture during the day where they can scratch in the soil, eat green plants and whatever bugs they find. For their protection from predators such as foxes and coyotes, the chickens are moved indoors at night.
 
Because chickens have a single stomach, they cannot be raised on grass and foraging skills alone. Their diets are supplemented with a conventional poultry diet which includes corn and soy. This all natural feed contains no antibiotics, hormones, or animal by products.

We have converted nearly all our poultry options to a non-GMO feed ration. Any selection that is GMO free will specifically be stated in the online description, such as our free-range chicken wings.

Due to growing interest and frequent customer requests, Maypop Farm also started raising soy-free chickens in the summer of 2011. These selections may be found in our soy free category. The only soy-free chicken products we currently offer will have "soy free" in the item description and ship directly from our South Carolina poultry farm. The soy-free chicken feed is non-GMO and does contain corn. Maypop Farm in Darlington, South Carolina also raises all of our free range 20 pound chicken bundles and ships those direct from the farm

The following poultry options are free range, but not GMO free: South Carolina chicken bundles (except for the Soy Free bundles, which are GMO free).

The following poultry options are not free range or GMO free: Turkey Jerky, Chicken Sausages, and Turkey Provolone Sausage.  These selections are free roam and antibiotic free from birth. The diet for these chickens is a conventional poultry diet which includes corn and soy.

describe the image

Duck: We source our ducks from upstate New York. All of our Pekin Ducks are free range and enjoy a diet free of growth hormones and antibiotics. 

10265418 10152211102529895 4447247749047002027 o resized 600

Dairy: We are very lucky to be able to source grass-fed dairy products, without any added growth hormones. We have two different Amish dairies- one in Indiana, the other in Pennsylvania, who supply us with raw, grass-fed cheese. The ingredients in our raw cheeses (except unsalted cheddar) are: milk, cultures, sea salt (either Redmond or Celtic - depends on variety), and rennet. We do not feed any antibiotics or hormones to any of our animals, and all of our cattle - both beef cattle and dairy cows - are 100% grass-fed and grass-finished, so they are not consuming any grains throughout their lives. They are grazing on pastures free of any sprayed fertilizers or pesticides.

The cheeses are not certified organic, but we are sourcing all of them from a group of Amish farmers, raising their animals the same way our ancestors did years ago - organically, but not certified

Lamb: Our lamb is raised in Oregon and southern Missouri on a 100% grass-fed diet devoid of any chemicals, hormones, pesticides or grain. The lamb enjoy lush pastures and plenty of rainfall.   

describe the image

Seafood: Our seafood products come from Vital Choice located in the state of Washington, one of the premier wild-caught seafood providers in the country. Their products are certified sustainable, and most products are caught off the west coast and surrounding waters. The only exception is our wild-caught raw shrimp which are harvested in the Pacific Ocean and processed in the United States. They are wild-caught and chemical free. 
 
We have carefully collaborated with like-minded farmers and individuals that hold their products to the same standards we believe in for our company. Long story short, we have built our business over the many years while respecting our animals and our environment. We enjoy the products, just like our customers, so it remains our goal to offer the best selection possible.  

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Product Information, Pork, Grass-fed Lamb, Seafood, Our Farms, Free-Range Poultry, Misc Info

An Avocado a Day May Help Keep Bad Cholesterol at Bay

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Mar 27, 2015 @ 12:53 AM

Eating one avocado a day as part of a heart healthy, cholesterol-lowering moderate-fat diet can help improve bad cholesterol levels in overweight and obese individuals, according to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Researchers evaluated the effect avocados had on traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors by replacing saturated fatty acids from an average American diet with unsaturated fatty acids from avocados.                                                               science article 150326

Forty-five healthy, overweight or obese patients between the ages of 21 and 70 were put on three different cholesterol-lowering diets. Participants consumed an average American diet (consisting of 34 percent of calories from fat, 51 percent carbohydrates, and 16 percent protein) for two weeks prior to starting one of the following cholesterol lowering diets: lower fat diet without avocado, moderate-fat diet without avocado, and moderate-fat diet with one avocado per day. The two moderate fat diets both provided 34 percent of calories as fat (17 percent of calories from monounsaturated fatty acids/MUFAs), whereas the lower fat diet provided 24 percent of calories as fat (11 percent from MUFAs). Each participant consumed each of the three test diet for five weeks. Participants were randomly sequenced through each of the three diets.

Researchers found:

  • Compared to the baseline average American diet, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) -- the so called 'bad cholesterol' -- was 13.5 mg/dL lower after consuming the moderate fat diet that included an avocado. LDL was also lower on the moderate fat diet without the avocado (8.3 mg/dL lower) and the lower fat diet (7.4 mg/dL lower), though the results were not as striking as the avocado diet.
  • Several additional blood measurements were also more favorable after the avocado diet versus the other two cholesterol-lowering diets as well: total cholesterol, triglycerides, small dense LDL, non-HDL cholesterol, and others.

These measurements are all considered to be cardio-metabolic risk factors in ways that are independent of the heart-healthy fatty acid effects, said Penny M. Kris-Etherton, Ph.D., R.D., senior study author and Chair of the American Heart Association's Nutrition Committee and Distinguished Professor of Nutrition at Pennsylvania State University, in University Park, Pennsylvania.

"This was a controlled feeding study, but that is not the real-world -- so it is a proof-of-concept investigation. We need to focus on getting people to eat a heart-healthy diet that includes avocados and other nutrient-rich food sources of better fats," Kris-Etherton said.

"In the United States avocados are not a mainstream food yet, and they can be expensive, especially at certain times of the year. Also, most people do not really know how to incorporate them in their diet except for making guacamole. But guacamole is typically eaten with corn chips, which are high in calories and sodium. Avocados, however, can also be eaten with salads, vegetables, sandwiches, lean protein foods (like chicken or fish) or even whole."

For the study researchers used Hass avocados, the ones with bumpy green skin. In addition to MUFAs, avocados also provided other bioactive components that could have contributed to the findings such as fiber, phytosterols, and other compounds.

According to researchers, many heart-healthy diets recommend replacing saturated fatty acids with MUFAs or polyunsaturated fatty acids to reduce the risk of heart disease. This is because saturated fats can increase bad cholesterol levels and raise the risk of cardiovascular disease.

The Mediterranean diet, includes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fatty fish, and foods rich in monounsaturated fatty acids--like extra-virgin olive oil and nuts. Like avocados, some research indicates that these not only contain better fats but also certain micronutrients and bioactive components that may play an important role in reducing risk of heart disease.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Heart Association

Journal Reference:

  1. Li Wang, Peter L. Bordi, Jennifer A. Fleming, Alison M. Hill, and Penny M. Kris‐etherton. Effect of a Moderate Fat Diet With and Without Avocados on Lipoprotein Particle Number, Size and Subclasses in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Randomized, Controlled Trial. Journal of the American Heart Association, January 2015 DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.114.001355

 

Topics: Paleo, Misc Info

Moving Day is Every Day

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Thu, Feb 26, 2015 @ 10:39 AM

By: Dr. Al Sears, MDComputer

I know it’s kind of a necessity to sit at a computer these days.

But sitting for long periods of time, whether it’s in front of a screen or otherwise, can be deadly.

I’ve seen what a sedentary lifestyle does to people because I treat them every day. But what the Annals of Internal Medicine found shocked even me.

The journal did an analysis where they looked at the results of over 40 other studies. Each study looked at risk of disease and early death for people who sit for long periods of time compared with those who don’t, and the effects of exercise on both.

They found that if you sit for very long periods of time, even if you interrupt that with a vigorous workout, you’re still around 16% more likely to die of any cause than people who don’t sit for very long periods at a time.(1)

That agrees with some harsh numbers from a study out of the National Cancer Institute.

They looked at more than 240,000 people, ages 50-71 years old. None had cancer or heart disease when the study started. They followed the people for eight and a half years.

People who were sedentary for more than 7 hours a day – even if they exercised every day – had a 61% higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, and a 22% higher risk of dying from cancer compared to those who were sedentary for less than an hour.(2)

Sitting in general is associated with a higher risk of dying ALL causes.

And for people who don’t exercise at all, the risks skyrocket. A 47% greater risk of dying from all causes, and a 100% greater chance of dying from cardiovascular disease. 100 percent!

That backs up an earlier study done in Australia that looked at almost 9000 people. It found that even after they adjusted for exercise people who sat and watched TV for more than four hours a day had a 46% higher risk of dying from all causes. The risk of dying from cardiovascular disease went up 80%.(3)

Regular exertion does make up for some of this.

The AIN analysis did find what I’ve always suspected to be true. People who get regular physical activity but still spend a large proportion of their day sitting are much less likely to die of any cause compared to those who get little to no exercise. 30% less likely, according to the study.

That’s why I give everyone who works for me an opportunity to get up and walk around, and especially go outside for a bit every day.

Plus, we’ve built a small studio in my new center where we’ve begun holding yoga classes for the staff that begin directly after work.

I recommend you do the same… at the very least, get up and walk around for a few minutes at a time every hour or so, no matter where you are.

Or do like I do and spend 12 minutes doing P.A.C.E.

It can save your life.

To Your Good Health,
Al Sears, MD

______________________________________________________________________________
Resources:

1.Biswas A, et. al. “Sedentary Time and Its Association With Risk for Disease Incidence, Mortality, and Hospitalization in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.” Ann Intern Med. 2015;162(2):123-132.
2.Matthews C, George S, Moore S, Bowles H, Blair A, Park Y, Troiano R, Hollenbeck A, Schatzkin A. “Amount of time spent in sedentary behaviors and cause-specific mortality in US adults.” Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;95(2):437-45.
3.Dunstan D., et. al. “Television Viewing Time and Mortality.” Circulation. 2010; 121: 384-391.

Topics: Misc Info, Exercise

“Sleep” Hormone Reawakens Your Youth Gene

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Jan 16, 2015 @ 10:21 AM

By: Dr. Al Sears, MDsleep resized 600

You could be 80 years old and feel like a teenager.

Or you could be in your 30's and feel like you have one foot in the grave.

The secret to feeling young is how well your body “talks” to your telomeres.

In doing research for my upcoming book on how to benefit from telomere biology, I’ve discovered an interesting fact. Telomeres have receptors that communicate with your hormones. They talk to each other.

That’s important because your hormones and your telomeres affect aging more than anything else. If they have “good” conversations you feel (and stay) young. If they have “bad” conversations you can age more quickly than your chronological age.

Youthful hormone levels tell telomeres, “We’re still young and strong! Continue to rebuild and revitalize these cells.”

The opposite happens when you have too little of a specific hormone. That signals the telomere that you’re “old.” Repair and maintenance work slows down. The cell takes on older, slower and less active behavior.

One of the most remarkable examples of this is the way the “sleep” hormone melatonin affects aging and telomeres.

Many studies show that melatonin’s antioxidant power prevents telomeres from shortening.(1)

But one group of researchers was looking into using melatonin for eye health. They found that melatonin protected the eyes by increasing telomerase, the enzyme that rebuilds telomeres.(2)

Another study also looked at melatonin’s role in activating telomerase. They divided 37 rats (both young and old) into two groups. For 21 days, one group received melatonin and the control group got nothing.

They tested each group for telomerase activity. In both young and old rats, the ones given melatonin had significant increases in telomerase.(3)

It’s very simple: increasing melatonin helps signal telomeres, through their hormone receptors, to increase telomerase. This helps you build a younger body at any age.

1. To safely get more melatonin, the first thing you want to do is normalize your own melatonin production.

This has a lot to do with getting rid of artificial electromagnetic around you. It can stop your brain from producing enough melatonin. [Note: I’ll be talking to you more about this kind of radiation, how it can affect your body, and how to protect yourself from it in an upcoming issue of my Confidential Cures newsletter. Please click here and subscribe now so you can be the FIRST to get this vital information.]

You should try to make yourself aware of electronic signals in your bedroom.

    - Do you listen to the radio while you’re trying to sleep by sending music from your smartphone to a Bluetooth speaker?

    - Do you have your phone next to your bed at night?

    - Do you have your DVR, laptop, iPad, and phone all in your room at night?

Get rid of them. And unplug your TV at night. These disrupt nighttime melatonin production.

2. Once you’ve stabilized and enhanced your natural melatonin function, then you can look for ways to get more of it for the anti-aging effect.

I’ve called melatonin a “hormone,” and it is. And I know that for some people, that can seem frightening. People have experienced side effects from artificial hormones.

But natural hormones at proper levels are completely safe. Melatonin is amongst the safest. There is no evidence to date to tarnish its perfect safety record.(4)

Even though foods like pineapples, bananas, oranges, oats, sweet corn, rice, tomatoes and barley contain melatonin, getting enough from your diet is very difficult.

Instead, it’s best to find a completely natural and high-quality melatonin supplement.

Many doctors and health experts recommend about 3mg a day for treatment. Around 500 mcg is for prevention. That’s fine for eye health and as a sleep aid. But to increase telomerase expression and help lengthen your telomeres, you need a much larger dose.

At my Center for Health and Wellness, we now recommend patients take 10mg of melatonin daily to kick-start telomerase expression. It’s a much larger dosage than you’ll hear most doctors recommend. But that’s because they haven’t heard of its effect on your telomeres.

One tricky thing about melatonin is the form it comes in. It’s not as effective in a pill because it’ll take longer to enter your bloodstream. And pills that are not well made get destroyed in your gut, and you never get the full effect. Look for melatonin liquids, sprays or anti-aging creams. They’re fast-acting and affordable.

To Your Good Health,
Al Sears, MD

______________________________________________________________________________

Resources:
1. Rastmanesh R. “Potential of melatonin to treat or prevent age-related macular degeneration through stimulation of telomerase activity.” Med Hypotheses. 2011;76(1):79-85.
2. Rastmanesh R. “Potential of melatonin to treat or prevent age-related macular degeneration through stimulation of telomerase activity.” Med Hypotheses. 2011;76(1):79-85.
3. Akbulut K, et. al. “The role of melatonin on gastric mucosal cell proliferation and telomerase activity in ageing.” J Pineal Res. 2009; 308-12.
4. Dean, Ward M.D. “Melatonin: Unique, Potent Life-Extending Nutrient.” Vitamin Research News: Anti-Aging Supplement Review and Update Part 3, August 2004, p 14.

Topics: Misc Info, Exercise