The Wellness Blog

USWM at Paleo(f)x - Austin, TX

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Jun 10, 2016 @ 04:49 PM

Only a handful of my friends will stomach Liverwurst.

Even fewer when it comes to Pemmican.

What the Paleo f(x) Conference with 5,000 attendees held in store for me completely flipped that standard.

Never, I thought, would I see a child throw a temper-tantrum because their parents would allow them to have ONLY ONE piece of Liverwurst. When this happened, I knew I was with MY people!

Grant with One Stop Paleo Shop Team

Being the only booth with Bacon, you can imagine how popular we were. And how wonderful we made The Palmer Events Center smell! Not only was it delicious, but the accolades we received  due to its lack of ingredients (Pork Bellies & Celtic Sea Salt) could fill a novel:

  • No sugar?
  • No honey?
  • No nitrates or nitrites?
  • Whole30 approved!
  • This is the way Bacon should taste!
  • Nothing but Pork and Hickory Smoke!
  • Reminds me of my Grandmother!

Needless to say, we were out of bacon in less than a day and a half! Note to self: bring more bacon next time!

Of course, we brought more than just Pork Bacon, Pemmican, and Liverwurst. Braunschweiger, Plain & Spicy Beef Jerky, Original, Salt & Pepper, and BBQ Pork Rinds were ready to serve. To the dismay of many, Pork Rinds were gone by the end of the second day! I found a fellow Pemmican addict in Maureen Quinn, who was equally saddened that it needed to be rationed by the third day.

Amanda Love, from The Barefoot Cook (sorry, not the Barefoot Contessa!), was gracious enough to cook up Ribeyes, NY Strips, Top Sirloin, and Leg of Lamb Steaks.

By the end of the conference, everyone knew exactly where the delicious whiff of meat was emanating.

But, I would feel guilty if I didn't tell you about some of our friends that we ran into:

After hours of grazing my way through Paleo f(x), I don't know how I had room for dinner.

What an unforgettable experience; Meeting the members of my Paleo Family to share our passion for this exploding revolution!

Happy Meating!

-Grant D. Cooper

Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Pork, Good Fats, Misc Info, US Wellness Meats

Choosing the Right Probiotic for Your Body

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Thu, Jan 14, 2016 @ 09:35 PM

How to Choose the Right Probiotic for Your Body (The Answer May Surprise You)

“You should take a daily probiotic…”

You’ve no doubt heard this advice if you suffer from any sort of intestinal issues or after taking antibiotics.

But in the last few years, probiotic therapy has taken a huge leap out of simple ‘gut care.’ It’s now well recognized that probiotics can help with a wide range of mental and physical conditions.

In 2013 the journal Beneficial Microbes published a review various studies related to obesity and the microbiome. The authors concluded that:

“[…]Lactobacillus gasseri SBT 2055, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103, and the combination of L. rhamnosus ATCC 53102 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 may reduce adiposity, body weight, and weight gain. This suggests that these microbial strains can be applied in the treatment of obesity.”1

Another review, published in CNS & Neurological Disorders – Drug Targets, suggests that probiotic therapy may also be useful in the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders.2

And there is the cutting edge of microbial therapy, involving ‘poop pills’ and ‘fecal transplants’ – treatments that are showing great promise for intestinal disorders.3

It’s no wonder that probiotic sales have increased by 36% in the last five years4 with expected growth of 40 percent by 2020.5

This growth also means that there are an overwhelming number of choices for the average consumer. Case in point: A quick search for the term ‘probiotic supplement’ on Amazon yields more than 9,000 results!

So how do you just “take a probiotic” without knowing the right one to choose? And how do you know whether the one you’re taking will confer the health benefits you’re specifically looking for?

The answer is relatively simple once you understand your gut bugs more intimately.

Human…Meet Your Microbes!

Human beings have 10x more bacterial cells in our bodies than we do human cells. That’s 100 trillion bacteria, from head to toe, inside and out. You may even hear some scientists say that we’re only really 10% human!

Inside our gut live anywhere from 500 to 1000 different species of bacteria, alongside various fungi and yeasts.6  They all live in a symbiotic relationship with each other and with you, their human host.

To demonstrate the huge variety, here’s a little basic microbiology:

1. 98% of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) contains bacteria known as Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. These are categorized on the microbial family tree as phyla.

2. Each of these two phyla has a large number of genera (or genus). Lactobacillus for example, is just one genus out of over 274.7

3. Those genera each contain a number of species. Lactobacillus has around 122 different species and L. acidophilus is just one of them.8

4. And finally, within each species, you can have various strains. For example L. acidophilus DDS-1.

Now, let’s put this into perspective with probiotics. Supplements do not contain entire phyla or even genera. Many will contain an entire species, but not all species. Some won’t even contain an entire species; they will just contain a few strains.

And unfortunately, when it comes to probiotics…

It’s not Just a Case of Good vs Bad

Our large population of microbes has a range of functions including digestion, immunity, producing vitamins and essential fatty acids. It is an entire ecosystem, living together as one. And it is the overall balance of the ecosystem which determines the health of the human host.

Science tells us we can change our microbial balance in as little as 24 hours just by simply changing their environment through diet.9,10

Paul O’Toole, a professor at the Biosciences Institute in Cork, states:

"Diversity is the key. What we see with people on narrow diversity diets is that the microbiota collapses.”11

Our gut bugs are highly influenced by the food we eat (or don’t eat) – not just by the probiotics we take … or don’t take.

You see, probiotic pills are only one fraction of the equation. The key to a healthy microbiome is to employ the multi-pronged strategy that encourages microbial diversity and nourishes our healthy gut bugs… the same way our ancestors did.

Boost Your Probiotics the Way Our Ancestors Did

  • Consume only grass fed beef, pastured poultry and eggs and wild caught fish. They are free of microbiome-altering antibiotics. Be diverse in your meat choices and allow all of your meat-loving microbes to get their nourishment. Add a little salt – you also have salt-loving bugs to keep happy!
  • Give your plant-loving gut bugs their food too! Fill your plate with lots of organic vegetables, especially powerful onions, garlic, jicama and daikon radish. These foods contain prebiotic fiber for Bifidus bacteria to feed on, and they’ll produce good healthy byproducts for your body.
  • Include lacto-fermented food daily like kefir, sauerkraut, kombucha and kimchi. Each of these foods contains different species of beneficial bacteria. Again, be diverse and use a range of different fermented foods to get a large variety of beneficial bacteria.
  • Include lacto-fermented meats like grass-fed corned beef. This one surprises many Americans, but fermented meats are rich in powerful probiotics and a healthy addition to a microbe-supporting diet.
  • Add coconut oil, garlic and ginger regularly to food. They’re naturally anti-fungal and anti-bacterial and help keep the microbiome in balance.
  • If you use probiotic supplements try a rotation strategy. Pick a trusted brand with good reviews, use it up and then switch to a totally different brand. This will enable you to get many strains and species instead of just a select few. Use a supplement that gives you as many CFU’s as possible – aim for tens of billions, the higher the better.
  • Beware of common chemicals that damage our microbes including bleach, hand sanitizer, chlorine and conventional personal care products. Opt for natural, “old-fashioned” methods and formulas to clean and care for your body.
  • Finally, keep stress well managed. This too can alter your microbial balance.

A balanced diet and lifestyle equals a healthy, balanced microbiome. End the probiotic supplement confusion with the simple diet tips noted above, and by making the choices our ancestors did to help preserve our ancient microbiome in a modern world.


ED NOTE
Love bread, but not the blood-sugar spiking carbs and grains? Check out Kelley’s newest book, Better Breads, including more than two dozen low-carb, grain-free, prebiotic-rich Paleo breads, biscuits, pancakes, muffins and more! Click here to learn more about Better Breads



REFERENCES

1.  Mekkes, M.C, Weenen, T.C, Brummer, R.J, Claassen, E. The development of probiotic treatment in obesity: a review. Beneficial Microbes. 2014;5(1): 19-28.

2. Slyepchenko, A, Carvalho, A.F, Cha, D.S, Kasper, S, McIntyre, R.S. Gut emotions – mechanisms of action of probiotics as novel therapeutic targets for depression and anxiety disorders. CNS Neurology Disorders Drug Targets. 2014;13(10): 1770-1786.

3. Xu, MQ, Cao, HL, Wang, WQ, et al. Fecal microbiota transplantation broadening its application beyond intestinal disorders. World Journal of Gastroenterology. 2015;21(1): 102 – 111.  

4. Statistica. Sales of probiotic products worldwide from 2010 to 2015, by region.

5. Markets and Markets. Probiotic Ingredients Market by Function (Regular, Preventative, Therapy), Application (Food & Beverage, Dietary Supplements, & Animal Feed), End Use (Human & Animal Probiotics), Ingredient (Bacteria & Yeast), and by Region - Global Trends & Forecast to 2020

6. Xu J, Gordon JI. Inaugural article: honor thy symbionts. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100: 10452–10459, 2003.

7. Wikipedia. Firmicutes Genera.

8. Wikipedia. Lactobacillus.

9. Lawrence, D.A, Corinne, F, Maurice, R.N. Diet rapidly and reproducibly alters the human gut microbiome. Nature. 2013; 505: 559-563.

10. Turnbaugh, P.J, Ridaura, V.K, Faith, J.J, Rey, F.E, Knight, R, Gordon, J.I. The Effect of Diet on the Human Gut Microbiome: A Metagenomic Analysis in Humanized Gnotobiotic Mice. Science Translational Medicine. 2009; 1(6): 6ra14

Andrew, A. “I had the bacteria in my gut analysed. And this may be the future of medicine.” The Guardian. February 11, 2014.

 

Topics: Misc Info, Exercise, US Wellness Meats

Forget Detoxing – Show Your Liver the Love It Needs with Ancestral Foods

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Jan 01, 2016 @ 10:27 PM
We live in a poisoned world...
 
Exhaust from cars, factories and power plants contaminate the air.
 
Chlorine and fluoride are added to our water… not to mention gender-bending chemicals and other pollutants that make their way to the tap.
 
Flame-retardants coat our furniture. Stain treatments protect our clothing.
 
We take chemical drugs when we are sick. We rub chemical cosmetics on our skin. And nearly everything on supermarket shelves has been preserved, dipped, dyed or sprayed.
 
According to EPA sales and use statistics, nearly one billion pounds of toxic pesticides and herbicides are intentionally introduced to the environment and our food supply each year. In fact, a study published in the Annual Review of Public Health estimates that the average person consumes a GALLON of pesticides and herbicides each year.1

We’re even exposed to toxins before we take our first breath. Researchers at two major laboratories recently found an average of 200 pollutants in the umbilical cords of babies, including industrial chemicals, consumer product ingredients, pesticides and wastes from burning coal, gasoline and garbage.2
 
Your body is immensely adaptable. It can protect you from occasional exposures to these contaminants. Unfortunately, however, for the average person, our exposures are anything but occasional. They are chronic and nearly constant.

The results of a lifetime of chronic exposure can be serious disease or just a general feeling of sluggishness, fatigue, pain and general “unwellness.”

Now, that’s the bad news.

But there is good news…

Fortunately you have a liver that is incredibly resilient. In fact, it is so perfectly designed that it can protect you from our toxic modern world. Of course, your best line of defense is to avoid toxins in every way possible.

But you must also give your liver the daily care it’s looking for. And I’m not talking about the latest detox trends.

First, it is important to understand what your liver is doing on your behalf. Then you can give it the love it needs!

Detox Pathways in a Nutshell

There are three main processes that occur in your liver to turn ingested toxins into excretions.
•Phase One Detoxification: This step includes oxidation, reduction, hydrolysis, hydration and dehalogenation. This phase turns toxins into different (but still toxic) substances.
•Intermediary step: Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions protect the liver against those substances from phase one. This is the liver’s way of cleaning up its own ‘mess’.
•Phase Two Detoxification (aka conjugation): This includes acetylation, methylation, sulphation, glutathionation, glucuronidation and transamination. These actions turn the toxic substances into water-soluble compounds for safe pathway through the body and excretion.
Think the “Master Cleanse” is the answer? Think again. In fact, each of these three vital detoxification steps involves a range of different nutrients. And unsurprisingly, these liver-cleansing nutrients are found abundantly in an ancestral diet.
 
Below, I share three of my favorite liver supportive foods – all backed by science. Consume these foods at least every few days to give your liver the nutritional support it needs.

Detox Food #1: The “Alligator Pear”

During the intermediary or second step of detoxification, your liver uses the antioxidant powers of vitamins A, C and E to help repair the damage caused by free radicals during phase one detoxification.

And it so happens that avocados are good sources of both C and E. But their antioxidant super-power goes far beyond that.

A 2005 study found that the addition of avocado to both salad and salsa significantly enhanced the absorption Vitamin A precursors (alpha and beta-carotene) within the foods.3

Earlier research, published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, tested 22 different fruits on liver damaged rats. Out of all the fruits, the researchers discovered that, “Avocado showed extraordinarily potent liver injury suppressing activity.” 4

Give your liver that soft touch by adding chopped avocado to salads, whirling into smoothies made with grass-fed whey protein, or create a delicious guacamole to serve alongside an antioxidant-rich salsa and grass-fed beef.

Detox Food #2: The “Stinking Rose”

Garlic pops up nearly everywhere when it comes to health promoting foods. And in the case of your liver, the so-called ‘stinking rose’ is a welcome gift.

Among many other beneficial nutrients, garlic contains a number of organosulfur compounds which your liver uses during phase-two detoxification.

But garlic may also prevent disease of the liver in other ways…

A 2009 study, demonstrated the liver-protecting power of garlic against acetaminophen toxicity. The study authors suggest that garlic may actually be used as “an antidote to the development of hepatitis.”5

Of course, garlic can be used to flavor just about any savory dish. But to capture its medicinal results, it should be added just at the end of cooking. Better yet, consume garlic crushed and raw so that it retains the majority of its active constituents. Mix it simply with oil or whirl with fresh herbs (like parsley and cilantro) in a blender to create a flavorful Chimichurri, then serve atop or alongside your favorite pastured chicken, wild fish or grass-fed beef dish.  

Detox Food #3: The Golden Healer

Curcumin is the active compound in the golden spice turmeric. It has long been studied for its powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. This also makes it highly valuable in that intermediate step between phase one and two detoxification.

A study conducted in 2012 and published in the Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand found that curcumin successfully regenerated and repaired damaged liver tissues in diabetic rats.6

And a 2014 review published in Food and Chemical Toxicology discusses curcumin’s ability with regards to heavy metal toxins. The authors state:
“Curcumin has shown, in clinical and preclinical studies, numerous biological activities including therapeutic efficacy against various human diseases and anti-hepatotoxic effects against environmental or occupational toxins.”7
It’s no surprise that turmeric pops up in many commercial detoxification supplements. But you can get the daily benefits of turmeric just by adding it as a condiment to your daily diet… and for a lot less money, to boot!

Use fresh turmeric root blended into smoothies with other organic liver-loving vegetables, berries and grass-fed whey protein, or just add a teaspoon of this golden healer to curries, sauces, salad dressing or any savory dish for a powerful boost.

In addition to these three detox superfoods, I’ve also written previously about the liver-cleansing benefits of clean protein and gelatin to boost glutathione, your master antioxidant and detoxifier.

Detox Daily with a Low Toxin, Ancestral Lifestyle

By enjoying a whole foods ancestral diet – rich in leafy greens, healthy fats, vibrant herbs and spices, wild seafood and pastured meats- you’ll provide your body with the nutrients it needs to detox effectively… all year long!  



ED NOTE
Love bread, but not the blood-sugar spiking carbs and grains? Check out Kelley’s newest book, Better Breads, including more than two dozen low-carb, grain-free, prebiotic-rich Paleo breads, biscuits, pancakes, muffins and more! Click here to learn more about Better Breads…
 

REFERENCES

Alavanja, M.C, Hoppin, J.A, Kamel F. Health effects of chronic pesticide exposure: cancer and neurotoxicity. Annual Review of Public Health. 2004;25: 155-197.

Body Burden: The Pollution in Newborns. Environmental Working Group, July 14, 2005.
 
Unlu, N.Z, Bohn, T, Clinton, S.K, Schwartz, S.J. Carotenoid Absorption from Salad and Salsa by Humans is Enhanced by the Addition of Avocado or Avocado Oil. The Journal of Nutrition. 2005;135(1): 431-436.
 
Kawagishi, H, Fukumoto, Y, Hatakeyama, M, et al. Liver Injury Suppressing Compounds from Avocado (Persea americana). The Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 2001;49(5): 2215-2221
 
Ezeala, C, Nweke, I, Unekwe, P, El-Safty, I, Nwaegerue, E. Fresh Garlic Extract Protects The Liver Against Acetaminophen-Induced Toxicity. The Internet Journal of Nutrition and Wellness. 2008;7(1)
 
Khimmaktong W, Petpiboolthai H, Panyarachun B, Anupunpisit V. Study of curcumin on microvasculature characteristic in diabetic rat's liver as revealed by vascular corrosion cast/scanning electron microscope (SEM) technique. Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand. 2012 May ;95 Suppl 5:S133-41.
 
Garcia-Nono, W. R, Pedraza-Chaverri, J. Protective effect of curcumin against heavy metals-induced liver damage. Food and Chemical Toxicology. 2014;69: 182-201.

 

Topics: Misc Info, US Wellness Meats

Could Garlic Be the Answer to This Global Health Threat?

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Mon, Dec 07, 2015 @ 06:27 AM

Imagine for a moment that you live in a world where a minor and routine surgery puts your life at risk, due to infection… and nothing can be done to save you.kelley herring

Sounds rather extreme, right?

What if, within this same world, one innocent bout of “stomach flu” took down your entire family with no possible way of treating it?

Again, this may sound extreme. Unfortunately, however, this is not a fictional tale. This is the reality of something that is already happening… widespread antibiotic resistance.

The World Health Organization reports that antibiotic resistance is a “serious threat to
global public health”. (1)  And the bacteria that are becoming resistant to antibiotics are not
rarely encountered. They are quite common and are among those that contribute to acne,
gastrointestinal illness, ulcers, stomach cancer and post-surgical infections.

You have probably heard of the ‘hospital superbug’ MRSA. This is a type of ‘staph’ bacteria
that can no longer be treated by the penicillin and cephalosporin classes of antibiotic. This
bacterium can cause infections that are highly contagious and extremely difficult to treat.

Even more common are infections from Campylobacter – the bacteria that is responsible for more than 2.4 million cases of “food poisoning” each year in American alone. And this bacteria is also becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics. (2)

Or, consider Helicobacter pylori. This common bug is present within the digestive track of two-thirds of the world’s population. In normal concentrations within a healthy microbiome, H.
pylori can provide benefits to the host. But it can also multiply out of control. This can
lead to ulcers and even stomach cancer. And this bacteria has also become resistant to
numerous medications. (3)  As a result, it can become a deadly threat.

How Have Humans Created This Global Threat?

… And can we protect ourselves?

The World Health Organization tells us:

“The development of antimicrobial resistance is a natural phenomenon. However, certain human actions accelerate its emergence and spread. The inappropriate use of antimicrobial drugs, including in animal husbandry, favors the emergence and selection of resistant strains.”

Quite simply, it is perfectly natural for bacteria to mutate and become resistant to threats
against them. But this has become pandemic as a result of the:

•    Over-prescription of antibiotics
•    Inappropriate use of antibiotics (failing to finish prescriptions, etc.)
•    Use of antibiotics in raising livestock and poultry

However, there are precautions you can take. And the scientific research has some very
interesting things to say about the anti-microbial effects of common garlic.

Folklore tells us that the “stinking rose” can ward off vampires. Science shows us that it can
kill the microscopic and antibiotic resistant ones!

What Makes Garlic So Effective At Fending Off Microscopic Vampires?

If you’re an avid fan of the health benefits of garlic, you know that its active compound is
an organosulfur compound known as allicin. But you might not know that organosulfur compounds are also found in most antibiotics. Just open a bottle and take a sniff.

The allicin in garlic is highly antimicrobial, as is diallyl sulfide –the breakdown product of allicin.  
But there’s an even more impressive antibacterial compound in the “stinking rose”  called
ajoene. Not only has ajoene been shown to kill Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella
pneumoniae, (4) it has also been shown to effectively eliminate the ‘hospital superbug.’

Researchers from the Department of Bacteriology at the Hirosaki University School of Medicine
tested garlic powder for its antibacterial properties against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and found it to be highly effective. (5)  It is not detailed which of the garlic compounds was tested.

Could Garlic Even Protect Against Food Poisoning?

Researchers from Washington State University researched the effects of diallyl sulfide on
Campylobacter jejuni – one of the most common causes of food poisoning (gastroenteritis). They compared the results to two common antibiotics: ciprofloxacin and erythromycin. They found that the garlic derivative was 100 times more effective on the bacteria than the antibiotics. (6,7)

Our pungent friend also inhibits Listeria and pathogenic E. coli. (8)

So it seems that garlic is not only a tasty additive to food, but also shows great promise as
a food additive to fight bacteria.

Is There A Link Between Garlic, Bacteria And Stomach Cancer?

H. pylori typically lives alongside us happily.  But for some people it can increase the risk
of ulcers and stomach cancer.

An article published in the Journal of Nutrition not only shows us that garlic can eradicate
H. pylori. It also hints that diet high in allium vegetables can be an important protector
against stomach cancer:

“The incidence of stomach cancer is lower in populations with a high intake of allium
vegetables. We have demonstrated in vitro that H. pylori is susceptible to garlic extract at a
fairly moderate concentration. Even some antibiotic-resistant H. pylori strains are
susceptible to garlic.”  (9)

Staying Healthy with Garlic… and Ancestral Wisdom

There are many things you can do to minimize your risk of developing an antibiotic-resistant
infection and maintain a healthy level of microbes:

•    Include both cooked and raw garlic as a regular part of your diet, along with onions,
      shallots, leeks and chives. These are all vegetables rich in the sulfur-rich compounds that
      ward off potentially harmful bacteria.
•    Brassica vegetables also contain organosulfur compounds. Include a daily dose of
     organic cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, arugula or bok choy to your         meals. For that extra beneficial bacterial boost, choose lacto-fermented versions like sauerkraut or kimchi.
•    Consume grass fed organic meats, poultry and eggs to reduce your intake of food-
     derived antibiotics.
•    Avoid cross contamination of foodborne bacteria by using different chopping boards for
     meats, poultry and vegetables. Always cook food properly and use sensible hygiene    procedures like washing hands and utensils in between working with meat and vegetables.
•    Use antibiotics wisely and only when necessary. Health guidelines also clearly state
     that finishing your entire dose reduces the risk of antibiotic resistance.
•    Optimize your vitamin D levels through sun exposure or safe supplementation.
•    Be physically active. Not only does this stimulate the immune system and lymph, but
     raising core temperature is important to fend off infections of all kinds.  


ED NOTE

Love bread, but not the blood-sugar spiking carbs and grains? Check out Kelley’s newest book,
Better Breads, including more than two dozen low-carb, grain-free, prebiotic-rich Paleo
breads, biscuits, pancakes, muffins and more! Click here to learn more about Better Breads


REFERENCES

 World Health Organisation Fact Sheet. Antimicrobial resistance. April 2015.. Accessed December 1 2015.

  Wieczorek, K, Osek, J. Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms among Campylobacter. Biomedical Research International. 2013; Article ID 340605. 

  Megraud, F. H pylori antibiotic resistance: prevalence, importance and advances in testing.
Gut. 2004; 53(9):1374-1384.

  Naganawa, R, Iwata, N, Ishikawa, K, Fukuda, H, Fujino, T, Suzuki, A. Inhibition of microbial
growth by ajoene, a sulfur-containing compound derived from garlic. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 1996; 62(11):4238-4242.

  Sasaki, J, Kita, T, Ishita, K, Uchisawa, H, Matsue, H. Antibacterial activity of garlic
powder against Escherichia coli O-157. Journal of nutritional science and vitaminology. 1999;
45(6):785-790.

  Lu, X, Samuelson, D.R, Rasco, B.A, Konkel, M.E. Antimicrobial effect of diallyl sulphide on
Campylobacter jejuni biofilms. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. 2012; doi:10.1093/jac/dks138

  Washington State University. (2012, May 1). Garlic compound fights source of food-borne
illness better than antibiotics. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 1, 2015

  Kumar, M, Berwal, J.S. Sensitivity of food pathogens to garlic (Allium sativum). Journal of
Applied Microbiology. 1998; 84(2):231-215.

  Sivam, G.P. Protection against Helicobacter pylori and other bacterial infections by garlic.
Journal of Nutrition. 2001; 131(3):1106S – 1108S.


Topics: Grass-fed Beef, Pork, Misc Info

Are "Aliens" Making You Hungry?

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Oct 09, 2015 @ 04:09 PM
Have you ever felt strong emotional cravings for certain foods? And have you ever experienced these cravings… even when you knew that your body had enough to eat.

It’s well known that emotions and stress can play a role in food cravings. And of course, your hormones also send signals to your brain that boost hunger and cravings.

But what if there was something else that could cause these feelings? In fact, what if some of the cravings you experience did not even originate in your own brain… but instead, you were acting on impulses from another entity?

This might sound like the beginning of a science fiction story. In this case, however, the truth might be stranger than fiction.

You’ve probably heard the word, microbiome. This is the ecosystem of microbes that reside primarily in your gut. We already know that this swirling mass of bacteria play a role in your immune system. They help digest your food and even provide vitamins and nutrients your body needs.

But this is not merely a passive population of hitchhikers, happy to eat whatever you decide to feed them. In fact, a growing number of researchers believe that the bacteria in your gut can promote feelings of hunger. What’s more, they can actually influence your dietary choices so that you favor the foods THEY thrive on (or those that suppress their competitors).

And that’s not necessarily a good thing…

“Bacteria within the gut are manipulative,” says Dr. Carlo Maley, one of the authors of a study published in the journal BioEssays. “There is a diversity of interests represented in the microbiome. Some are aligned with our own dietary goals. Others are not.”

 

What Does Your Bacteria Want From You?

Estimates are that the average person has between 15,000 and 30,000 different species of bacteria, fungi and other microbes in their gut. Each of these species has a preference for specific food sources that allow them to feed and reproduce.

Some species of gut bacteria thrive on the fiber found in vegetables. Some are specialists that digest and prefer seaweed (these have been isolated from humans in Japan). Others thrive on cellulose (these have been found in African children raised on sorghum).

Researchers have even identified certain populations of bacteria that are common to those who have a “strong desire” for chocolate... while those who are indifferent to chocolate have a very different bacterial mix.

And then there are those species that thrive on sugar, grains and the basic ingredients of the standard processed diet…

According to author and genetic epidemiology professor, Tim Spector, the microbes living inside you, “have their own evolutionary drive to maintain their ecological niche. They will do anything to ensure their survival. This includes sending signals to the host human that they want more of the same junk food that they thrive on.”

Yes, it’s true…

To ensure their own dominance and survival the bugs in your gut will insist that you consume whatever they say, even when it’s not in the best interests of your health.

And scientists are just beginning to understand how this works…

 

Willpower Is No Match For Bio-Power

It’s proven that the brain can use signaling molecules to influence gut bacteria. But the lines of communication go both ways.

Not only do these bacteria recognize the hormones and neurotransmitters your body uses. They can even synthesize these chemical signals to control your behavior!

A recent study, published in the journal BioEssays highlights the ways these “alien” hitchhikers can potentially control your brain.

The authors believe your gut bacteria may be able to change the expression of your taste receptors, making certain foods taste better.

They can release hunger-inducing hormones and peptides.

They are able to stimulate the vagus nerve directly (this is the connection between 100 million nerve cells in the digestive tract and the base of the brain).

They can even manipulate your feelings by producing compounds that are converted into dopamine and serotonin – thus taking control of your body’s basic “feel good” reward system!

These “aliens” want you to feed them and they will stop at nothing until you do.

 

But you CAN outsmart them and get the control back.

You are not powerless when it comes to creating a good relationship with the “aliens” that reside in your gut. The key is to do things that cause the thousands of species of good bugs to proliferate, so that they can “outcompete” and overcome the species of bad bugs.

The good news is that researchers have measured positive changes in the microbiome within just 24 hours of positive dietary changes. These are simple changes that you can make outside the lab.

Again, from the study in BioEssays:

“Because microbiota are easily manipulatable by prebiotics, probiotics, antibiotics, fecal transplants, and dietary changes, altering our microbiota offers a tractable approach to otherwise intractable problems of obesity and unhealthy eating.”


How Can You Cultivate a Healthy Inner Ecosystem?


As I’ve noted in previous essays, here are the six easy steps to a balanced microbiome and a better relationship with food:

1.    Re-populate the good bacteria:  Populate your healthy gut bacteria with good probiotic food sources including lacto-fermented vegetables (like sauerkraut and kimchi), kefir, kombucha and other foods preserved using traditional methods. Probiotic supplements are also useful in changing gut populations.

2.    Maintain daily with natural probiotic foods: Our ancestors obtained a lot of their probiotic bacteria from the soil. These bacteria, called soil based organisms (SBOs), support digestive balance. Consume fresh, organic veggies raised in healthy soil, and don’t wash them too ‘clean’.

3.    Feed the good bacteria and starve the bad: Many vegetables contain powerful prebiotic fiber that feeds our good bacteria. Onions, jicama, garlic and leeks are great choices. Reduce and eliminate sugar along with processed grains. These feed the growth of hostile microorganisms.

4.    Don’t kill them with pesticides and antibiotics: Choose organic, pesticide-free foods to avoid destroying the good bacteria you are working so hard to nourish. Source grass-fed meats, organic pastured poultry, organ meats and wild caught fish, which are free of antibiotics. Avoid antibiotics and use only when necessary.

5.    Minimize modern products: To maintain the integrity of the gut, minimize or eliminate the use of antibacterial products. Consume only filtered or spring water, which doesn’t contain chlorine, perchlorate and fluoride. And remove gut-damaging processed foods such as those containing aspartame, sucralose and preservatives. These have been shown to destroy gut bacteria.

6.    Stress Less: Our ancestors experienced periods of stress followed by periods of rest. By adopting a similar lifestyle we can influence our microbiota in positive ways.  In the words of the popular book “don’t sweat the small stuff”.

 

Are You Growing Sugar-Craving or Vegetable-Loving Bugs?


Our microbiome starts growing the day we are born; the type of birth we had and the health of our mother begins the process. Our environment influences these bugs as we journey through life. Modern processed diets and toxic lifestyles influence the growth of the bad bugs, while ancestral diets support the good guys.

It's like a garden; plant it well, remove the weeds and don’t kill the flowers. Your current food preferences provide feedback about what type of garden was planted and how it was maintained.

By choosing to eat and live the way our ancestors did, we can improve the balance of our microbiome and our relationship with food.

ED NOTE
Love bread, but not the gut-harming carbs and grains? Check out Kelley’s newest book, Better Breads, including more than two dozen low-carb, grain-free, prebiotic-rich Paleo breads, biscuits, pancakes, muffins and more! Click here to learn more about Better Breads

REFERENCES
1.    Alcock, J. Maley, C., Aktipis, A. Is eating behavior manipulated by the gastrointestinal microbiota? Evolutionary pressures and potential mechanisms. BioEssays, August, 2014. DOI: 10.1002/bies.201400071
2.    Norris, V, Molina, F, Gewirtz, AT. Hypothesis: Bacteria Control Host Appetites. J Bacteriol. 2013 Feb; 195(3): 411–416.
3.    Wallis, C. “How Gut Bacteria Help Make Us Fat and Thin.” Scientific American. June 1, 2014.
4.    Beck, J. “Your Gut Bacteria Want You to Eat a Cupcake.” The Atlantic. August 9, 2014.

Topics: Misc Info, Weight Loss

Write A Review & You Could Win!

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Thu, Sep 17, 2015 @ 01:18 PM

Hi folks!

We're celebrating our 15-year anniversary this month! 

We wouldn't be where we are today without each and every one of you. We appreciate your continued support and patronage. We look forward to many more years of doing what's good for our animals, good for our planet and good for you. 

What better way to kick off the anniversary festivities than with a giveaway? So here are the details...

In case you missed it, our new and improved website has the option to leave product reviews. Just click the product(s) you wish to review and select 'add your review' and you're done. Easy peasy, right?

Submit a review of any of our online selections between Thursday, September 17 - Tuesday, September 22 to be entered to win a $100 gift certificate!

Upon leaving a review you will automatically be entered into our drawing. Only one entry per person, but you're welcome to leave multiple reviews. The winner will be randomly selected and announced on Friday, September 25. 

Good luck & happy reviewing! 

0000900_100-us-wellness-meats-e-gift-card_300

REVIEW NOW


 

 

 

REVIEW NOW

Topics: Product Information, Misc Info, Contests

The Accidental Discovery

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Aug 28, 2015 @ 02:44 PM

SpicesThis Discovery Can Add Flavor & Health Benefits To Your Food

Many of the world’s greatest culinary discoveries were made serendipitously. But very few were as impactful as the discovery of using spices to flavor and preserve food.

Anthropologists have shown that thousands of years ago, our hunter-gatherer ancestors would often wrap their kill in leaves and bark to preserve and transport the contents inside. Only later did they discover that this method of preservation could also improve the taste of their food.

And so the worlds’ love affair with spices began…

SPICES & HERBS: THE CULINARY CURATIVES

As civilization advanced, the use of spices became ubiquitous in culinary tradition. But it wasn’t just for their flavor-enhancing abilities. It was also for the health-promoting properties they possessed:

Texts from Ancient Egypt (1555 BC) deemed coriander, fennel, juniper, cumin, garlic and thyme as powerful medicine. It is also known that laborers who constructed the Great Pyramid of Cheops consumed onion and garlic as a means to promote health.

•    Black pepper, cinnamon, turmeric, cardamom have been used by Indians for thousands of years for both culinary and health purposes.
•    Hippocrates wrote extensively about spices and herbs, including saffron, cinnamon, thyme, coriander, mint, and marjoram. Of the 400 herbal remedies he created, at least half are still used today.
•    Theophrastus, the "Father of Botany”, authored two books summarizing the knowledge of over 600 spices and herbs.
•    Dioscorides, a Greek Physician of the 1st century, authored De Materia Medica – an extensive medical and botanical guide that was used for over 1,500 years.
•    In the Middle Ages (600-1200 AD), European apothecaries used herbs and Asian spices including ginger, pepper, nutmeg, cinnamon, saffron and cardamom in their remedies.
•    Plants were used as the primary source of medicine in the United States from the time of the Mayflower (1620) until after World War I (1930).

Science now proves that the instincts and knowledge of our ancestors were correct: Spices and herbs can be powerful medicine. In fact, countless studies show that herbs and spices possess a wide range of beneficial phytonutrients that can kill bacteria, viruses and parasites. They also act as powerful antioxidants and can promote cellular health, reduce inflammation, and more.

And one of the most convenient ways to harness the health-and-flavor enhancing power of herbs and spices is a homemade dry rub.

4 CHEF-INSPIRED DRY RUBS: POTENT FLAVOR – WITH BENEFITS

Complimenting just about every kind of food – from meat, chicken, fish and vegetables – a dry rub is a combination of herbs, salt and spices that is applied before grilling, broiling, baking or roasting.

As you know, there are many commercial seasoning blends available. However, these often contain chemical preservatives, MSG, anti-caking agents and other unsavory additives. By creating your own custom combinations at home, you can ensure a higher quality, additive-free product that is personalized to your tastes.

Using just one or two spices and herbs can produce delicious results. But if you really want to elevate your food to new heights, don’t be afraid to experiment with new ingredients and unique combinations. You can make a dry rub from nearly any combination of herbs, spices and salt. Here are four chef-tested dry rubs to try in your cooking:

Za’Atar

Use On: This exceptionally versatile Middle Eastern spice mix can be used on every kind of meat, fish or vegetable.
The Blend: ¼ cup sumac, 2 Tbsp. dried thyme, 1 Tbsp. roasted sesame seeds, 2 Tbsp. dried marjoram, 2 Tbsp. dried oregano, 1 tsp. sea salt
Yield: ~2 Tbsp.

Ras El Hanout

Use On: The name of this Moroccan spice mix translates to "head of the shop" – as it often includes the best spices the purveyor has to offer. Try on grass-fed steaks, wild-caught salmon and chicken.
The Blend: 2 tsp. ground ginger, 2 tsp. ground coriander, 1 ½ tsp. ground cinnamon, 1 ½  tsp. freshly ground black pepper, 1 ½ tsp. ground turmeric, 1 tsp.  ground nutmeg, 1 tsp.  ground allspice, 1/2 tsp.  ground cloves
Yield: ~ ¼ cup

Mediterranean Dry Rub

Use On: This classic blend goes with just about anything – from pastured pork, lamb and chicken to wild seafood.
The Blend: ¾ cup dried basil , ¼ cup dried thyme , 2 Tbsp. dried sage, 2 Tbsp. fennel seeds, 1 Tbsp. sea salt, 1 Tbsp. black peppercorns
Yield: ~1¼ cups

BBQ Dry Rub

Use On: A classic BBQ favorite that complements pastured chicken, ribs, and brisket
The Blend: ¼ cup paprika, 2 Tbsp. granulated garlic, 2 Tbsp. granulated onion, 2 tsp. black peppercorns, 1 tsp. dry mustard, 1 tsp. chili powder, 1 Tbsp. cumin seed (toasted), 3 Tbsp. coriander seed (toasted), 1/4 cup sea salt, 2 Tbsp. coconut sugar
Yield: ~1 ¼ cups

TIPS FOR USING DRY RUBS

Now that you have a few flavor combinations to start with, I’d like to share how you can maximize the seasoning power and life span of your dry rubs:

Toast to Get the Most: Many spices – especially cinnamon, cloves, allspice, coriander and cumin – benefit from a little heat. A brief toast in a dry skillet will coax more flavor out of these in particular.  

Grind Fine: Finely milling your spice and herb blends allows more surface area to come into contact with your food, producing deeper flavor. Use a spice mill or coffee grinder to powder your dry rub to a uniform consistency.

Prepare The Canvas: For each pound of meat, poultry, or seafood coat entire surface with 2 to 3 teaspoons melted lard, tallow, duck fat or coconut oil. Then apply one to two tablespoons of dry rub.

Coat Well: When using dry rubs, coat the entire surface of the food, ensuring it sticks. Not only will this ensure you get the full flavor effect, but it will also produce a beautiful crust. To produce a stronger flavor, cover pre-rubbed meats or chicken and refrigerate to allow the flavors to penetrate for up to 24 hours. Then cook as desired.

Store Properly: Spices and herbs lose potency, and light, heat and oxygen speed this loss. Store in a cool, dry place in an airtight container for up to 6 months.

Adding dry rubs to your cooking repertoire won’t just add more flavor to your food, but also more health-promoting nutrients. So season often and liberally with these flavor-packed dry rubs, and change up the spices and herbs you use to get the full-spectrum of their healing powers.

We would love to hear from you.  Do you use dry rubs in your cooking? If so, do you have a favorite combination?

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ED NOTE
Kelley Herring is the author of the new book Better Breads – which includes more information you need to know about why it is so important to avoid wheat and grains in your diet, plus how to use healthy replacements for these foods to create all the breads you love… without the gluten, carbs and health-harming effects. Click here to learn more about Better Breads

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REFERENCES
1.    Rosengarten Jr, Frederic. "The Book of spices." The Book of Spices. (1969).
2.    Tapsell LC, Hemphill I, Cobiac L, Patch CS, Sullivan DR, Fenech M, Roodenrys S, Keogh JB, Clifton PM, Williams PG, Fazio VA, Inge KE. Health benefits of herbs and spices: the past, the present, the future. Med J Aust. 2006 Aug 21;185(4 Suppl):S4-24. 4. History Online. Medicinal Uses of Herbs and Spices.
3.    Bellamy D, Pfister A. World medicine: plants, patients and people. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1992.
4.    Block E. Antithrombotic agent of garlic: a lesson from 5000 years of folk medicine. In: Steiner RP, editor. Folk medicine, the art and the science. Washington DC: American Chemical Society, 1986:125-137.
5.    Chevallier A. The encyclopedia of medicinal plants. London: Dorling Kindersley, 1996.


Topics: Misc Info

Could These Farm-Fresh Foods Cause Pain?

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Fri, Aug 14, 2015 @ 07:27 AM

Ruby-red tomatoes… crisp bell peppers… spicy-hot cayenne pepper…  nightshade resized 600

For most people, these are garden-fresh ingredients for a healthy diet, rich in a variety of health-promoting nutrients like vitamin C and lycopene. But for others, these seemingly healthy foods can be the cause of pain, migraines, stiffness and systemic inflammation.

Arthritis & The Nightshade Family

As members of the nightshade (or Solanaceae) family of vegetables, tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, peppers and other common foods contain a number of potentially problematic compounds, including glycoalkaloids and steroid alkaloids.

These compounds can inhibit acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme responsible for flexibility of muscle movement. And for some people, consuming these foods can cause stiffness and joint pain related to arthritis.  

Dr. Norman F. Childers, PhD, founder of the Arthritis Nightshades Research Foundation states:

"Diet appears to be a factor in the etiology of arthritis based on surveys of over 1,400 volunteers during a 20-year period. Plants in the drug family, Solanaceae (nightshades) are an important causative factor in arthritis in sensitive people."

In fact, a growing number of doctors and health experts believe that the symptoms of arthritis are often a misdiagnosed reaction to consuming nightshades. What’s more, many people who suffer from other inflammation-related illnesses – such as lupus, rheumatism, fibromyalgia, and musculoskeletal pain disorders – often find relief with a nightshade-free diet.

Take the Nightshade-Free Challenge

It’s important to note that not all people are sensitive to nightshades to the same degree. However, when an inflammatory condition exists, eating nightshades can compound the problem.

If you want to determine if nightshades could be a cause of pain, stiffness or chronic inflammation, you should consider taking a nightshade-free challenge. For three weeks, avoid all nightshade family foods including:


•    Potatoes, all varieties (NOTE: sweet potatoes and yams are not nightshades.)
•    Peppers, all varieties (red, green, yellow, orange, jalapeno, chili, cayenne, pimento.)
•    Tomatoes, all varieties (including Tomatillos)
•    Paprika
•    Eggplant
•    Pepino melon
•    Goji berries
•    Cape gooseberries
•    Ground cherries
•    Garden huckleberries
•    Ashwaganda

It’s also important to avoid foods that contain solanine (one of the steroid alkaloids). These include:

•    Blueberries
•    Huckleberries
•    Okra
•    Artichokes

Some prescription and over-the-counter drugs, homeopathics and other consumables also contain nightshades or solanine. Be sure to read labels and watch for:

•    Belladonna (the deadly nightshade often found in homeopathics)
•    Potato starch in medications and many packaged products
•    Edible flowers including petunia, chalice vine, day jasmine, angel and devil’s trumpets
•    Atropine and Scopolamine (compounds used in sleep aids)
•    Topical capsaicin creams (derived from cayenne)
•    Potato-based vodka

After three weeks, begin to reintroduce nightshades to your diet, one at a time. As you reintroduce these foods, be sure to keep a journal with notes about your symptoms and their severity, including energy levels, pain and stiffness, headaches, etc. Obviously, if you notice an increase in symptoms or severity upon reintroduction of these foods, it is likely that you are sensitive to nightshades and these foods should be avoided.

As the adage goes: "One man's meat is another man's poison." If you are suffering from a pain-related illness, consider a nightshade-free challenge diet. Like many others, you may find a big improvement in your quality of life and a decrease in pain.

Do you have issues with nightshades? If so, what experiences have you had? What benefits have you noticed by eliminating / reducing these foods in your diet?  

_______________________________________________________________________________

ED NOTE
Kelley Herring is the author of the book Better Breads – which includes more information you need to know about why it is so important to avoid wheat and grains in your diet, plus how to use healthy replacements for these foods to create all the breads you love… without the gluten, carbs and health-harming effects. Learn more about Better Breads…

_______________________________________________________________________________

REFERENCES
1.    Smith, Garrett, ND. Nightshades. Problems from these Popular Foods Exposed to the Light of Day. Weston A. Price Foundation. March 30, 2010
2.    N.F. Childers, Ph.D., M.S. Margoles, M.D. An Apparent Relation of Nightshades (Solanaceae) to Arthritis. Journal of Neurological and Orthopedic Medical Surgery (1993) 12:227-231
3.    Childers NF. Arthritis-Childer’s Diet to Stop It. Nightshades, Aging, and Ill Health, 4th ed. Florida: Horticultural Publications, 1993; 19-21.
4.    Patel B, et al. Potato glycoalkaloids adversely affect intestinal permeability and aggravate inflammatory bowel disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2002 Sep;8(5):340-6. PubMed ID: 124796498.
5.    Childers N.F., Russo G.M. The nightshades and health (extensive literature). New Jersey (Somerville) and Florida (3906 NW 31 Pl., Gainesville 32606): Hortic Pub, 1977
6.    D’Arcy WG. Solanaceae: biology and systemics. New York: Columbia University Press, 1985
7.    Heiser CB Jr. The fascinating world of the nightshades, 2nd ed. New York: Dover Publ, 1987

Topics: Heart Health, Misc Info

Paleo Takeout + US Wellness Meats Giveaway!

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Tue, Jun 23, 2015 @ 09:26 AM

 Hello real foodies! 

***Don't miss an exclusive recipe and giveaway at the end of this post.***

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We've known home chef, blogger, and cookbook author Russ Crandall (aka- The Domestic Man) for many years. Like us, Russ believes in an ancestral, whole foods way of eating. We are so thrilled to share the release of his second cookbook, Paleo Takeout. Available today, June 23rd!

Before we get to the giveaway, Russ has generously agreed to let us share a NEW recipe that can only be found in Paleo Takeout. It's one of our favorites, and we're sure you'll love it too!

______________________________________________________________________________

SWEET AND SOUR CHICKEN

1IM8vQwcDJG8maMqWrMsah56juF8Mv0nILWJzesdueE resized 600SAUCE:

  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 3 tbsp honey
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste 
  • 1 tbsp tamari
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/4 tsp white pepper

NUGGETS:

  • 2 tbsp expeller-pressed coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup tapioca or arrowroot starch
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp white pepper
  • 2 lbs boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into bite-sized chunks
  • 2 large eggs, beaten

SLURRY:

  • 1 tbsp arrowroot starch
  • 1 tbsp cold water
  • 1/2 tsp sesame seeds, to garnish
  • 2 green onions, sliced, to garnish

- In a saucepan, combine the sauce ingredients. Bring to a simmer over medium-low heat, then reduce the heat to low to gently simmer as you prepare the rest of the meal; stir occasionally.

- Preheat your oven to 250°F. In a wok or skillet, warm the coconut oil over medium heat. Combine the tapioca starch, salt, and pepper, then toss the chicken pieces with the starch mixture. With your fingers, dip a starchy chicken piece in the beaten eggs, shake off the excess egg, and then add to the oil. Repeat until you have filled your skillet, being careful not to overcrowd the chicken pieces. Fry the chicken until cooked through, flipping every 2 minutes, about 6 to 8 minutes per batch. As you finish each batch, place the cooked pieces on a plate lined with paper towels; put them in the oven to stay warm. You should be able to cook the chicken pieces in 3 or 4 batches, depending on the size of your skillet.

- Once the chicken is cooked through, finish the sauce. Taste the sauce and add more salt or pepper if needed. If the sauce is too dark and strong tasting, add a little chicken broth to thin it out. At this point, the sauce should be about as thick as tomato soup and should have a sharp but not overwhelming flavor.

- In a small bowl, stir together the arrowroot starch and cold water to create a slurry. Raise the sauce temperature to medium; once bubbling, add half of the slurry and stir until thickened, adding more slurry if needed. Remove from the heat.

Toss the chicken pieces with the sauce, then garnish with sesame seeds and green onions. Serve over Basic Steamed Rice (page 286) or Cauliflower Rice (page 288).

* Consider adding chunks of onion, bell pepper, or even pineapple to enhance the flavor of this dish. These ingredients should be added with the starch slurry in step 4.

* This dish is equally delicious made with sliced pork loin or shrimp.

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HERE'S YOUR CHANCE TO WIN!

We're pairing Paleo Takeout with a $150 US Wellness Meats gift certificate to give to one of our loyal followers. 

Enter via the widget below: 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Thanks for participating!

Topics: Paleo, Misc Info, Contests

How Gluten Promotes Chronic Disease (Even if You are NOT Gluten Sensitive)

Posted by US Wellness Meats on Sat, Jun 20, 2015 @ 01:41 AM

Author: Kelley Herring   Author: Kelley Herring

If you are a student of health and nutrition, then you’ve certainly heard a lot about the benefits of a gluten-free diet over the last several years. In fact, there is a good chance that you have made the choice to eliminate grains and gluten from your own diet.

But you’re probably also familiar with the backlash against this way of eating from a few vocal bloggers, journalists, doctors and possibly even your own friends and family. I recently came across an article in Time, with the title, “Eat More Gluten, The Fad Must Die.” The same day, I received an email with the subject line, “99% of People Should Stop Eating Gluten Free.”                      

Many of these critics claim that a gluten-free diet will cause you to miss out on critical nutrients. Others claim that a grain-free diet is only necessary for the less than one percent of the population (two to three million Americans) who suffer from Celiac disease. For anyone else, they claim, a gluten-free diet is but a waste of time and money, with no particular benefit.

Today, I’ll show you why these conclusions are reckless and unfounded. I will also show you why a grain-free diet is critical to your long-term health – even if you’re able to consume foods containing gluten with no apparent adverse effects.

So, let’s begin with the facts…

It is quite easy to refute the claim that, “99 percent of people should stop eating gluten free.” This is based on the logical fallacy fact that less than 1 percent of the people in the U.S. are currently diagnosed as Celiac. Of course, it does not account for those who have the disease and have not been diagnosed. More importantly, it excludes the additional 18 million Americans (at least) known to suffer from gluten sensitivity – a heightened immune response to gluten that causes discomfort and a wide range of systemic effects.

But research continues to mount that gluten is NOT the only problematic compound in cereal grains. Furthermore, we are discovering that the immune response that gluten elicits in some people – most notably Celiacs – is not the only health issue to be concerned about.

New research, published by Dr. Alessio Fasano at Harvard, confirms that gluten-containing foods impact the health of ALL who consume them, by increasing the risk of a “leaky gut.”

Gluten:  The Loaded Gun for a Leaky Gut (and Brain)

Dr. Fasano discovered that exposure to gliadin – a protein found in gluten -- increases the permeability of the epithelial lining of the gut. And this happens in healthy subjects, as well as those with Celiac.

A healthy gut plays a critical role in the function of your immune system. Of course, it also helps to extract nutrients from your food, allowing these compounds to enter the bloodstream where they can nourish your body. But the gut also serves as a critical barrier. It is supposed to block harmful substances and undigested food particles from entering the bloodstream.

However, when the small spaces between gut cells (called tight junctions) expand, a wide range of substances that would never pass through a healthy gut into the bloodstream are allowed to pass right through.

What’s more, consumption of gliadin was ALSO found to increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, allowing proteins, viruses, bacteria and toxins in the blood to breach this normally safeguarded space.

As you can imagine, a “leaky” gut and brain have been linked to a host of seemingly unrelated symptoms and chronic diseases including (but certainly not limited to):
●    Rheumatoid arthritis
●    Food allergies
●    Asthma
●    Eczema
●    Inflammatory bowel disease
●    Lou Gehrig’s disease
●    HIV
●    Cystic Fibrosis
●    Diabetes
●    Autism
●    ADHD
●    Alzheimer’s disease
●    Parkinson’s
●    Brain fog and fatigue

While these conditions may seem disconnected, they share a common root:  Inflammation.

In fact, Dr. David Perlmutter, M.D., renowned neurologist and the author of Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain for Life says:

“In millions of people today, the gut is largely disrupted by increased intestinal permeability  which fuels a continuous state of low-grade inflammation.”

Gluten Promotes Inflammation: The Cornerstone of Chronic Disease

Among the substances that leak into the bloodstream from the gut, one of these is particularly nefarious: lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

LPS is a compound that makes up the outer membrane of certain types of bacteria in the gut. These bacteria normally live within the confines of your gut without issue. But when they pass through the gut into the bloodstream – where they don’t belong – they cause a sharp inflammatory response.

In fact, LPS is so inflammatory that it is actually used experimentally in the lab to create inflammation.

A leaky gut will increase the amount of LPS that circulates in your blood. Systemic inflammation (including brain inflammation) and an increased risk of disease is the inevitable result.

(NOTE: You can test your levels of LPS, and therefore your degree of gut permeability, with a test called the Cyrex Array 2. The test costs around $200.)

Heal Your Gut and Reduce Inflammation with a Gluten Free Ancestral Diet

Research now shows that gluten can cause long-term health consequences… even in the absence of gluten sensitivity or Celiac disease.

Focus your diet on the nutrient-dense foods our ancestors enjoyed – including gut-healing foods like bone broth and saturated fats from animals raised on pasture – to help seal and heal your gut and reduce the systemic inflammation associated with chronic disease.

Do you have any experience with leaky gut? If so, how did you heal it?

Editor’s Note
Kelley Herring is the author of the new book Better Breads – which includes more information you need to know about why it is so important to avoid wheat and grains in your diet, plus how to use healthy replacements for these foods to create all the breads you love… without the gluten, carbs and health-harming effects. Click here to learn more about Better Breads…

REFERENCES
1.    Jargon, Julie. “The Gluten Free Craze: Is It Healthy?” Wall Street Journal. June 22, 2014  
2.    Kluger, Jeffrey. “Eat More Gluten; The Fad Diet Must Die”. Time Magazine. June 23, 2014
3.    Perlmutter, David. Brain Maker: The Power of Gut Microbes to Heal and Protect Your Brain for Life. Little, Brown and Company; 1 edition (April 28, 2015)
4.    Fasano A.Intestinal permeability and its regulation by zonulin: diagnostic and therapeutic implications.Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2012 Oct;10(10):1096-100. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2012.08.012. Epub 2012 Aug 16.
5.    Fasano A .Zonulin and its regulation of intestinal barrier function: the biological door to inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer.Physiol Rev. 2011 Jan;91(1):151-75. doi: 10.1152/physrev.00003.2008.
6.    Groschwitz KR1, Hogan SP.Intestinal barrier function: molecular regulation and disease pathogenesis.J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Jul;124(1):3-20; quiz 21-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2009.05.038.
7.    Turner JR.Intestinal mucosal barrier function in health and disease.Nat Rev Immunol. 2009 Nov;9(11):799-809. doi: 10.1038/nri2653.
8.    Drago S, El Asmar R, Di Pierro M, Grazia Clemente M, Tripathi A, Sapone A, Thakar M, Iacono G, Carroccio A, D'Agate C, Not T, Zampini L, Catassi C, Fasano A. Gliadin, zonulin and gut permeability: Effects on celiac and non-celiac intestinal mucosa and intestinal cell lines. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2006 Apr;41(4):408-19.
9.    Lammers KM1, Lu R, Brownley J, Lu B, Gerard C, Thomas K, Rallabhandi P, Shea-Donohue T, Tamiz A, Alkan S, Netzel-Arnett S, Antalis T, Vogel SN, Fasano A. Gliadin induces an increase in intestinal permeability and zonulin release by binding to the chemokine receptor CXCR3. Gastroenterology. 2008 Jul;135(1):194-204.e3. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2008.03.023. Epub 2008 Mar 21.

Topics: Misc Info